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All sixty-three Kolb Society fellows were once junior fellows. Each fellow has completed the dissertation and achieved a Ph.D. or has finished the course of study engaged in while a junior fellow and graduated with a B.A. or M.A. Post graduation, the fellows are pursuing careers both within and outside of academia.

 

Matthew D. Adams, Ph.D
Senior Research Scholar, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU
Elected: 1981 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Matthew graduated from Penn with a dual Ph.D. in Egyptology and Anthropology in 2005. His dissertation was entitled "Community and Society in Egypt in the First Intermediate Period: An Archaeological Investigation of the Abydos Settlement Site." He is currently a Senior Research Scholar at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Also, he is Associate Director and Field Director of the Institute's field research program at Abydos. In 2013–2014 Matt is serving on the board of the American Research Center in Egypt.

Link:
http://www.nyu.edu/gsas/dept/fineart/academics/abydos/abydos.htm


Joanne Baron, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2011 (Department of Anthropology)

Joanne is a lecturer in the department of Anthropology. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. Joanne excavates in Guatemala, studying the ancient Maya of the Classic Period (A.D. 250–900). Her research investigates the strategies used by Maya communities to retain their local identity and autonomy in the face of inter-polity hierarchies. Her dissertation, entitled "Patrons of La Corona: Deities and Power in a Classic Maya Community," was supervised by the late Emeritus Fellow Robert Sharer and her dissertation chair was Senior Fellow Richard Leventhal. In addition, Joanne works with Simon Martin, an associate curator at the Penn museum. For her dissertation, Joanne spent five field seasons excavating with the La Corona Regional Archaeology Project, directed by Marcello Canuto and Tomas Barrientos. La Corona is located in Northwestern Guatemala and contains a series of small temples that belonged to the site's patron gods. Just as modern towns sometimes have patron saints, ancient Maya cities also had patron gods that were the focus of community cults. Joanne's dissertation focuses on the ways these gods were worshiped and their importance in the creation of community identity and autonomy. In 2010 she received a prestigious Wenner-Gren dissertation fieldwork grant. She was also honored as a 2011 SAS Dean's Scholar. She has presented her dissertation research in the form of several conference papers as well as forthcoming publications. In 2014 she will begin work at a new site in Northwestern Guatemala together with a Guatemalan colleague.

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/

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Janice Barrabee, Ph.D.
Web and Program Coordinator, Kolb Foundation
Consulting Scholar, Penn Museum
Elected: 1994 (Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies)

Janice received an A.B. in Anthropology and graduated summa cum laude from Princeton in 1987. She earned an M.A. from Bryn Mawr College in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology in 1991, and her Ph.D. in Assyriology from Penn in 2002. She also spent a year at the Institut für Assyriologie und Hethitologie, Ludwig Maximilian Universität in Munich, Germany. Upon graduation she took a position as a Research Associate and subsequently Editor for the Institute for Aegean Prehistory (INSTAP). She has recently been a Visiting Scholar in the Department of the History of Art at Penn. She is currently the Web and Program Coordinator for the Kolb Foundation and a Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum.

Janice's research focuses on the Sumerian and Akkadian language texts and the art of ancient Mesopotamia, with a special interest in literary texts, and textual and artistic representations of religion and ritual. Her dissertation entitled "The Rise of the Sun God and the Determination of Destiny in Ancient Mesopotamia," investigated the ideological and ceremonial response to the rising sun evidenced in Ur III and Old Babylonian period Sumerian and Akkadian compositions. She has presented papers and published articles in connection with her dissertation research, and has a recent article (2011) entitled "The King of Justice: A Reconsideration of the River Ordeal in BM 45690," which interprets a vivid account of the performance of the river ordeal in Mesopotamia. She is collaborating on the Buffalo Seal Project with Senior Fellow Holly Pittman. In addition, she is conducting research on Akkadian period seals with sunrise imagery in the Penn Museum collection, and will present a paper on that topic at the upcoming AIA annual meeting in January 2012. Janice also works with local elementary and middle schools in order to promote an understanding of archaeology and ancient civilizations in the early stages of learning.

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Ellen E. Bell, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Geography, and Ethnic Studies, California State University, Stanislaus
Elected: 1999 (Department of Anthropology)

Ellen earned a B.A. in Anthropology from Kenyon College in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007. Her area of specialty is Mesoamerican Archaeology. Her dissertation, entitled "Early Classic Ritual Deposits within the Copan Acropolis: The Material Foundations of Political Power at a Classic Period Maya Center," focused on ritual deposits at the site of Copan, located in western Honduras. These include the Hunal and Margarita tombs, thought to have held the remains of the first king of the Classic period Copan dynasty, K'inich Yax K'uk' Mo', who reigned from 426–437, as well an important woman, most likely his queen. Her research interests include: Mesoamerican archaeology, material culture studies, political organization, archaeology of gender, Maya epigraphy and iconography, household archaeology, anthropology of religion and ritual, and the history of Mesoamerican archaeology.

Ellen has been a faculty member at C.S.U., Stanislaus since 2007. She is presently an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Institute for Archaeological Research. She also advises the Anthropology Club. In 2010–2011 she was a Dumbarton Oaks Fellow in Pre-Columbian Studies, investigating the topic of "Objects of Power on the Edge of the Maya World: Early Copan Acropolis Tombs, Offerings, and Special Deposits."

Ellen is co-director of the El Paraíso Region Archaeological Project (PAREP), which investigates administrative strategies in the Classic Maya Kingdom of Copan, Honduras. She includes undergraduate and graduate students in her research projects, and works to conduct all investigations within a framework of community responsive archaeology. She is also involved in the Kenyon Honduras Digitization Project (KHDP), which is building a digital archive of over 30 years of household archaeology in western Honduras that will be accessible on-line. In the spring of 2011 she chaired and presented "Who's at the Top in a 'Top-Down' Approach?: Social Differentiation and Administrative Strategies in the El Paraíso Valley, Department of Copan, Honduras" in a poster session at the Society for American Archaeology 76th Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA. Her publications include Understanding Early Classic Copan, published by the University of Pennsylvania Museum, several book chapters, and articles in English and Spanish journals, including Ancient Mesoamerica, The Journal of Archaeological Science, Mexicon, Expedition, and Yaxkin.

Links:
http://www.csustan.edu/anthro/Faculty/EllenBell.html
http://parep.research.yale.edu/

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Seth Bernard, Ph.D.
Faculty, Classics Department, Swarthmore College
Elected: 2008 (Ancient History Graduate Group)

Seth earned his B.A. in Classics at Amherst College in 2003. Prior to joining the Ancient History program he worked with the Greek and Roman collection at the Metropolitan Museum and the Yale Art Gallery. He also spent a year studying as a Fulbright Fellow as a Regular Member at the American School at Athens. He has excavated at Ancient Corinth and worked on a survey in eastern Morocco. He is currently involved in bringing to publication the excavation of an imperial villa in the Valle del Sacco in Lazio, south of the town of Anagni in Italy (the Villa Magna Project co-sponsored by the Penn museum). His work on the masonry styles and Roman brick stamps helped to secure a Hadrianic date for the villa's earliest phases. In 2010 he was named a Dean's Scholar, an award open to the entire graduate student community. He also received a Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching by Graduate Students. This fall Seth joined the Classics Department at Swarthmore College.

Seth's main interests lie in ancient urbanism and the Roman economy. This winter, he will defend his dissertation on public construction and society in Rome during the middle Republican period, c. 400–150 B.C.E, when the city of Rome took on a great deal of economic and urban complexity for the very first time. His work involves a close study of the material and documentary record for all building projects in the city during this time span. Situating changes in technology and urban layout in technology within their historical context allows an understanding of how the creation of an urban fabric impacts a city's residents. Given the great effort necessary for monumental architecture in the pre-industrial world, the construction industry at Rome and elsewhere can be viewed as a prime force behind changes in a city's economy and society.

Seth just returned from a year as pre-doctoral Rome Prize fellow at the American Academy in Rome, where he has completed the fieldwork for his dissertation. He has recently published an article entitled "Pentelic Marble in Roman Architecture and the Republican Marble Trade" in the Journal of Roman Archaeology. This article presents the results of isotopic analysis of two early marble temples at Rome as well as Seth's economic model for the system by which Rome first extracted, transported, and built with Greek marble in the late second century B.C.E. He has also published in the Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, and has contributed to the forthcoming Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History.

Links:
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/
http://www.aarome.org/
http://www.villa-magna.org/

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Alexis Boutin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Sonoma State University, California
Elected: 2005 (Department of Anthropology)

Alexis graduated from Pomona College in Claremont, CA with honors in 2000, majoring in History, with a minor in Classics; she earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2008. Her dissertation was entitled "Embodying Life and Death: Osteobiographical Narratives from Alalakh." Alexis is currently an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Sonoma State University in California. The bioarchaeological fieldwork and museum collections research she conducts focuses on ancient Near Eastern, Arabian Gulf, and eastern Mediterranean societies. She has participated in excavations, survey, and collections research at Alalakh, Turkey; Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project on the island of Cyprus; Tel el-Far'ah South, Israel; on the island of Crete; and in the United Kingdom. She has also worked on osteological collections at the British Museum and, most recently, the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. She is the co-director (with Fellow Benjamin Porter) of the Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project, which is based at the Hearst Museum.

Alexis' publications use human skeletal remains, archaeological contexts, and ancient texts to explore embodied personhood in all of its iterations. Much of her teaching is oriented around human skeletal biology and its analysis by means of forensic methods. In addition to the lower division G.E. course "Introduction to Biological Anthropology," her upper division offerings include "Human Osteology," Bioarchaeology," "Organization of Societies," and "Forensic Anthropology." Alexis is working on several co-authored and co-edited volumes and has a forthcoming book co-edited with Fellow Aubrey Baadsgaard and Jane E. Buikstra, Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death: Contemporary Approaches to Bioarchaeology.

Link:
https://www.sonoma.edu/users/b/boutin/

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Cortney Chaffin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of East Asian Art History, Department of Art and Design, College of Fine Arts & Communication (COFAC), University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point
Elected: 2002 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations)

Cortney received her B.A. from the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She earned her M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her doctorate in 2007 at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (EALC), with a specialization in Chinese Art and Archaeology. Her dissertation, entitled "Strange Creatures of Chu: Antlered Tomb Sculptures of the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods," examined wooden sculptures painted with lacquer and adorned with real deer antlers in order to determine the significance of these burial images. Cortney studied abroad in China, and she is fluent in Mandarin.

Cortney taught at the University of Michigan-Dearborn in the Art History Department before coming to University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 2007, where she teaches the non-western art history classes, specializing in the arts of China, Eurasia, Japan, and India. She is also active in the Center for East Asian Studies. In 2009, she organized a month-long event sponsored by the College of Fine Arts & Communication, "COFAC creates: Japan—the Floating World." This included an exhibition of 18th–19th century Japanese woodblock prints from the Utagawa school loaned by the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, as well as lectures and performances. She followed this in early spring of 2012 with "COFAC Creates: Xu Bing-The Art of Rewriting China," a program of events featuring the work of contemporary Chinese artist Xu Bing. The event also included a series of lectures, workshops, films, and performances on contemporary Chinese art.  She also led a study tour to China with Professor Larry Ball in 2010, entitled Life and Death in Early and Imperial China. Cortney has lectured on topics stemming from her dissertation, including a recent presentation at Masterworks of Ancient Chinese Art: A Conference at the Portland Art Museum.

Link:
http://www.uwsp.edu/art-design/Pages/Faculty/CortneyChaffin.aspx

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Bien Chiang, Ph.D.
Section Director, Institute of Ethnology Academica Sinica, Taiwan
Associate Professor at the Institute of Anthropology at National Tsing Hua University
Elected: 1987 (Department of Anthropology)

Bien Chiang was one of the first junior fellows supported by the Kolb Foundation. He graduated from Penn with a Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1993. His dissertation, "House and Social Hierarchy of the Paiwan," was an ethnographic study of an Austronesian group of approximately 55,000 people inhabiting the southern part of the island of Taiwan. Soon after graduation he returned to Taiwan, where he is an Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology Academica Sinica and an Associate Professor at the Institute of Anthropology at National Tsing Hua University. Also, he is a Research Fellow at the Center for Asia-Pacific Areas Studies (CAPAS), established in 2003. His research is published primarily in Chinese.

Links: http://www.ioe.sinica.edu.tw/Content/Researcher/content.aspx?&SiteID=530367205133077215&MenuID=530400021400001437&Fid=0&MSID=530210537660572643
http://www2.hss.nthu.edu.tw/en/model1.php?id=3500

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Miriam Clinton, Ph.D.
Critical Writing Fellow, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2008 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Miriam received her B.A. summa cum laude with Distinction in both Archaeological Studies and Classical Civilizations at Yale University in 2005. As an undergraduate, she had field experience in the United States and in Italy, and was trained in conservation techniques and the historiography of Minoan civilizations at Palaikastro, Crete. She joined AAMW with a strong interest in the Aegean Bronze Age, especially Minoan Crete. In 2009–2010, she completed a Fulbright year in Greece. Miriam received her Ph.D. in 2013. Her dissertation, under her advisors, Prof. Philip Betancourt and Prof. Thomas Tartaron, is titled "Access and Circulation Pattern Analysis in Neopalatial Architecture on Crete:  A Methodology for Identifying Private Spaces." Her topic focuses on access and circulation patterns of Minoan houses, with the goals of determining 1) how these are associated with existing formal typologies of Minoan houses; 2) whether they relate to socio-economic status; and 3) how they can allow us to determine the distinction between public and private architecture.

Miriam participates in the Saronic Harbors Archaeological Research Project (SHARP) in Korfos, Greece, directed by Thomas F. Tartaron of Penn and Daniel J. Pullen of Florida State University. She also conducts fieldwork with the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete and has worked at Plakias, Mochlos, Karoumes, and Papadiokampos, a Proto- and Neo-palatial town near Siteia.

She presented a paper at the AIA Annual Meetings in January 2011 entitled "New Evidence for Minoan Staircases," which arose directly from her dissertation research, and has presented several others on a variety of topics, including "Transitional Spaces in Pre- and Proto-Palatial Minoan Tomb Architecture" in 2013. She has also published an article entitled "Rapid Cooling Effects in Early Bronze Age Copper Smelting Slags from Chrysokamino," with co-authors Shannon Martino, George H. Myer, Dennis O. Terry, Jr., and Philip P. Betancourt in Aegean Archaeology 8 (2009): 21–30. She is currently completing four chapters for the SHARP monograph and collaborating with a ceramic specialist on Crete to find the most likely clay sources to be used in association with known Minoan sites, especially Papadiokampos and Mochlos. They will attempt to find the routes used to travel between those clay sources and the workshops where pottery was produced.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/
http://upenn.academia.edu/MiriamClinton

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Deborah M. Deliyannis, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of History, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana     
Elected: 1990 (Department of the History of Art)

Deborah graduated from Yale University in 1988, with a degree in Archaeological Studies. The same year, she entered the graduate program in the Department of the History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania, and was named a Kolb junior fellow in 1991. She completed her Ph.D. in 1994, under the direction of Cecil L. Striker (History of Art) and James J. O'Donnell (Classics), with a dissertation entitled "The Liber Pontificalis Ecclesiae Ravennatis:  Critical Edition and Commentary." She has taught at Western Michigan University, and is currently Associate Professor in the Department of History at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Deborah specializes in the history and material culture of early medieval Europe (c. 400–900 A.D.); in her research, she combines her background in archaeology and architectural history with the study of the way history was written in the Early Middle Ages. She has published a Latin edition (Brepols, 2006) and an English translation (Catholic University of America Press, 2004) of the ninth-century author Agnellus' Liber pontificalis ecclesiae Ravennatis (Book of Pontiffs of the Church of Ravenna). Each of these volumes includes a study of the text, in which she explores Agnellus' literary models and sources, and explains why the text has its rather idiosyncratic form and chronological structure. Her most recent book, Ravenna in Late Antiquity (Cambridge University Press, 2010), is a history of the city and monuments of Ravenna from the fifth to the ninth centuries. Her current project, tentatively entitled Bishops and Buildings in the Early Middle Ages, considers the role of bishops as church-builders from late antiquity through the Carolingian period. In addition to these research projects, she has edited a book entitled Historiography in the Middle Ages (Brill, 2003), and co-edited, with Judson Emerick, Archaeology in Architecture: Studies in Honor of Cecil L. Striker (von Zabern, 2005).  Finally, she is the Executive Editor of The Medieval Review, an online book review journal in medieval studies.

Links:
http://www.indiana.edu/~histweb/faculty/Display.php?Faculty_ID=53
https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3631

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Paul Delnero, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Assyriology, Johns Hopkins University
Elected: 1997 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Paul graduated from Purdue University in 1995 and received his Ph.D. from Penn in 2006. The title of his dissertation was "Variation in Sumerian Literary Compositions: A Case Study Based on the Decad." He is an Assistant Professor of Assyriology
 at Johns Hopkins University.

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Kristen Fellows, Ph.D.
Elected: 2010 (Department of Anthropology)

Kristen received her B.A. from the University of Florida in Anthropology. She graduated with a Ph.D. from Penn's Anthropology department in 2013. She has participated in fieldwork at Monticello, Virginia; Paynes Town Seminole Site, Florida; Vineland, New Jersey; Pahala Plantation, Hawaii; Rose Hill, New York; Samaná, Dominican Republic; Portsmouth, Dominica; and Mandeville, Jamaica. Kristen's subfield of choice is historical archaeology. Her research interests include Caribbean studies, with a particular focus on the Dominican Republic; feminist and gender archaeologies; plantation systems; enslaved communities; race and racisms; early globalization; and social stratification.

Kristen's dissertation, with the title "African Americans from 'Back Yonder': The Historical Archaeology of the Formation, Maintenance, and Dissolution of the American Enclave in Samana, Dominican Republic," focuses on a free black community who emigrated from the United States to Haiti in the 1820s and their descendants who have remained in what is now Samaná, Dominican Republic. This community serves as a lens through which she explores the processes of community formation and maintenance and the intersection of race and nation. In 2010 she conducted fieldwork in the Dominican Republic; the primary focus was an aboveground study of the cemetery in the town of Santa Barbará de Samaná, involving surveying, mapping, and aerial photography. She also completed a series of oral history interviews with local members of the descendant community and archival research locally and at the Sociolinguistic Laboratory at the University of Ottawa. She has presented a poster and a series of papers on her findings at the annual meetings for the Society for Historical Archaeology including a poster in January 2011, the paper "Boundary Making in the African Diaspora: 'Inmigrantes Norteamericanos' in Samaná, Dominican Republic" (2012) in a session she co-chaired, and the paper "African Americans in a Dominican Cemetery: Social Boundaries of an Enclave Community" (2013). In January, 2014, she will present the paper "Negotiating Transnational Identity in Post-Revolutionary Hispaniola" in Quebec City.

During the summers of 2012 and 2013, Kristen served as the Field Director at Marshall's Pen, a colonial coffee plantation outside of Mandeville, Jamaica. With James Delle (Kutztown University), the P.I. on the project, she has multiple articles forthcoming concerned with this site, as well as a wheat plantation site in Upstate New York. These publications include: "The Racialization of Labor in Early 19th-century Upstate New York: Archaeology at the Rose Hill Quarter Site, Geneva," in Race in the Northeast: Archaeological Studies of Racialization, Resistance, and Memory; "Death and Burial at Marshall's Pen, a Jamaican Coffee Plantation, 1814–1839: Examining the End of Life at the End of Slaver," Slavery and Abolition; and "A Plantation Transplanted: Archaeological Investigations of a Piedmont-Style Slave Quarter at Rose Hill," Northeast Historical Archaeology.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/

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Michael D. Frachetti, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 
Elected: 2000 (Department of Anthropology)

Michael graduated with honors from SUNY at Buffalo in 1997 with a degree in Anthropology. He received a M. Phil with distinction in Archaeology from St. John's College, Cambridge University, in 1999. He wrote his dissertation entitled, "Bronze Age Pastoral Landscapes of Eurasia and the Nature of Social Interaction in the Mountain Steppe Zone of Eastern Kazakhstan," and garnered his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2004. He was a Visiting Post-doctoral Scholar in the Eurasian Department at the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut in Berlin (2004–2005), and then joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and is the Director of the SAIE Lab. He is also a Research Associate at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology (UCLA). In 2012 Michael began a three-year term on the Kolb executive committee as a director of the Kolb Foundation. He is also a Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU for the 2012–2013 academic year.

Michael's research centers on the Bronze Age (ca. 3500–1000 B.C.E.), pastoral nomadic societies living in the steppe region, mountains, and deserts of central and eastern Eurasia, focusing on questions of social and economic interaction between regional populations across central Asia at that time. He has written numerous articles, including "Differentiated Landscapes and Non-Uniform Complexity among Bronze Age Societies of the Eurasian Steppe," in B. Hanks and K. Linduff, eds., Social Complexity in Prehistoric Eurasia: Monuments, Metals and Mobility, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009: 19–46 and "Variability and Dynamic Landscapes of Mobile Pastoralism in Ethnography and Prehistory," in H. Barnard and W. Wendrich, eds., The Archaeology of Mobility: Nomads in the Old and in the New World, Cotsen Advanced Seminar Series 4, 2008: 366–96. He has also published the monograph Pastoralist Landscapes and Social Interaction in Bronze Age Eurasia, Berkley: University of California Press (2008). Michael lectures throughout the United States and internationally, and recently participated in the Penn Museum Symposium in March 2011 accompanying the Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition, with a talk entitled "Seeds for the Soul: East/West Diffusion of Domesticated Grains along the Inner Asian Mountain Corridor."

Michael currently conducts field research in eastern Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. He is the director of the Dzhungar Mountains Archaeology Project (DMAP) in Kazakhstan, which began in 1999, and more recently, a project referred to as Malguzar Uzbek/American Archaeological Research (MALGUZAAR) in Uzbekistan. From 2010 to 2011 he directed the Zaamin Archaeological Pilot Project (ZAPP), which consisted of two field-seasons of archaeological survey and test excavations in the Zaamin territory of eastern Uzbekistan. He is also the director of the Nias Island Assessment of Social impact on Ecology (NIASE) Project, examining the ecological impact of the degradation of the coastline and the response to intensive environmental change on the island of Nias (Indonesia) after the tsunami in 2004 and the earthquake in 2005.

Links:
www.saie.wustl.edu
http://www.saie.wustl.edu/index.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7qq9__GWN0&feature=BFp&list=PL286E934A56954D08&index=4

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William Bradley Hafford, Ph.D.
Project Manager, Ur Digitization Project, Penn Museum
Elected: 1995 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate group)

Brad earned a B.A. in Anthropology and a B.A. in Classical Studies at the University of Washington in Seattle, receiving magna cum laude honors for both degrees. He was also phi beta kappa. In addition, he has an Associates Degree in Communications Technology from Community College of the Air Force. His Ph.D. was received from the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group at the University of Pennsylvania in 2001, and his dissertation was entitled "Merchants in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean: Tools, Texts and Trade." Brad has been a Lecturer in the Critical Writing Program of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at Penn. He has also served as a Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum. Brad has recently been named the Project Manager of the Ur Digitization Project at the museum.

Brad's area of specialization is in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age. His research focuses on ancient economics, trade routes, and particularly physical assemblages of merchants, as well as the origins of currency. Other archaeological interests include field methods, site mapping, computer applications, and underwater archaeology. He has excavated in the United States at the sites of San Juan Islands, Washington, and Castle Rock Pueblo and Sand Canyon Pueblo, Colorado; participated in the Scottish Coastal Survey in Britain; and excavated at Pseira and Chrysokamino on Crete. He has served as an area supervisor of the Tell es-Sweyhat Archaeological Project since 1998 and was an Associate Director of the excavations from 2008 to 2010. He is the Assistant Director of the Howard University Giza Cemetery Project.

Brad has written both fiction and non-fiction, including pieces about archaeology and ancient civilizations for educational children's magazines Calliope and Dig. His scholarly contributions include a co-authored article "The City of Sweyhat: A Mesopotamian Mystery," in Current World Archaeology (2008), and "Hanging in the Balance: Precision Weighing in Antiquity," in Expedition (2005) and "Mesopotamian Mensuration: Balance Pan Weights from Nippur," in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient (2005). In 2012 he published "Weighing in Mesopotamia: The Balance Pan Weights from Ur," Akkadica 133: 21–65. He is currently working on publishing all of the Nippur weight data from his 2005 article with Open Context so that it is easily available for further research.

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Ömür Harmanşah, Ph.D
Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University
Elected: 1999 (Department of the History of Art)


Ömür Harmanşah has been an Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University's Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World since 2007. He works and teaches on the archaeology of the ancient Near East, particularly Mesopotamia, Anatolia and Syria. Born and raised in Turkey, Ömür studied architecture and architectural history at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He received his Ph.D. in the History of Art from University of Pennsylvania in 2005. Prior to coming to Brown, he also taught at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. He recently was a Senior Fellow at Koç University's Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations in Istanbul, Turkey.

Ömür's academic interests are increasingly focused on issues of landscape, place, performance, and memory. He is particularly influenced by the developing fields of material culture studies; ethnographies of space, place and landscape; and anthropological theories of art, technology and agency. He is currently working on a monograph entitled "Imagined Cities: Architecture, Space and Commemoration in the Ancient Near East." He is directing the Brown University based Yalburt Yaylası Archaeological Landscape Research Project, a regional survey in the Konya Province of West-Central Turkey.

Links:
http://proteus.brown.edu/harmansah/Home
http://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Omur_Harmansah
http://rcac.ku.edu.tr/
http://proteus.brown.edu/eventplace/Home
http://brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/

 

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Salah Hassan, Ph.D.
Goldwin Smith Professor of African and African Diaspora Art History and Visual Culture, Department of History of Art and Visual Culture, Cornell University
Director of the Institute for Comparative Modernities (ICM),
Elected: 1986 (Department of Folklore and Folklife)

Salah received a B.A. with honors in 1978 from the University of Khartoum. He earned an M.A. in 1984 from the University of Pennsylvania, and graduated with a Ph.D. in 1988. His dissertation, which he wrote in the Department of Folklore and Folklife, was entitled "Lore of the Traditional Malam: Material Culture of Literacy and Ethnography of Writing among the Hausa of Northern Nigeria." Presently, he is Director of the Institute for Comparative Modernities (ICM) and Goldwin Smith Professor in the Department of History of Art and Visual Culture at Cornell University. Salah served as Chair of the department between 2000 and 2005. Throughout his career he has taught graduate and undergraduate courses on African and African American art history, African aesthetics, African cinema, Blacks in film, and contemporary art and theory, while simultaneously mentoring and successfully supervising numerous master and doctoral theses.

Links:
http://africana.cornell.edu/people/hassan.cfm
http://arthistory.cornell.edu/people/hassan.cfm
http://icm.arts.cornell.edu/icm_members.html

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Susan Helft, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of History, Rutgers, Newark, New Jerey
Elected: 2005 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Susan earned a B.A. in Ancient Studies at Barnard College in 2000. She received her Ph.D. from Penn in 2011. Her dissertation was entitled "Patterns of Exchange/Patterns of Power: A New Archaeology of the Hittite Empire." Susan's main area of interest is Near Eastern archaeology with a focus on Bronze Age Anatolia. She has participated in several excavations in the Ukraine, in Israel , and in Turkey, working at Tell Atchana/Alalakh. Susan is a Lecturer in the Department of History at Rutgers University in Newark.

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Jane Hickman, Ph.D.
Editor of Expedition
Consulting Scholar and Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs, Penn Museum
Elected: 2006 (Department of Anthropology)

Jane Hickman received her M.A. in 2000 and her Ph.D. in 2008 in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she received an M.L.A. and an M.A.S. from Johns Hopkins University, as well as a B.S. from Towson University in Baltimore, MD.
As a graduate student at Penn, during the 2004–05 academic year, she was a Fulbright scholar at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Jane's research focuses on gold and silver jewelry from the ancient Aegean, the Near East, and Central Asia. Her dissertation was entitled "Gold Before the Palaces: Crafting Jewelry and Social Identity in Minoan Crete." Her main area of interest is the Aegean, and she has excavated at Corinth, as well as Hagios Charalambos and Chrysokamino on Crete.

Jane is currently the Editor of Expedition magazine. She also serves as a Consulting Scholar and Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs. In that capacity, she organizes academic programs such as panel discussions and conferences. She recently (spring 2011) organized the Secrets of the Silk Road Symposium: "Reconfiguring the Silk Road: New Research on East-West Exchange in Antiquity," accompanying the exhibition at the Penn Museum. She is co-editing a volume with Victor Mair stemming from the symposium. She has delivered papers and published articles on jewelry from various sites. In March 2011 she presented "A Closer Look at Gold Jewellery from Tillya Tepe," in the conference at the British Museum "Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World." She recently published "The Dog Diadem from Mochlos," in a volume for Emeritus Fellow James Muhly, Metallurgy: Understanding How, Learning Why. Studies in Honor of James D. Muhly.

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Jane Hill, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Rowan University
Elected: 2008 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Jane Hill received her B.A. in Journalism at the University of Mississippi where she graduated summa cum laude in 1987. After working as a beat reporter and investigative writer for several newspapers in the southeastern United States, Jane returned to graduate school at the University of Memphis where she earned her M.A. in Anthropology in 1999 studying Pre-Columbian Mississippian cultures. She also earned another M.A. in Art History and Egyptology from the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology at the University of Memphis in 2001. Her thesis, Cylinder Seal Glyptic in Predynastic Egypt and Neighboring Regions, was recognized as the outstanding thesis in Art History in 2002, and was published in 2004. While in Memphis she worked with Dr. William J. Murnane on his epigraphic survey of the Hypostyle Hall in Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt.

In 2000, Jane was accepted into the Penn's Egyptology program. Her research interests include the development of writing in ancient Egypt's Predynastic and Early Dynastic periods and how it was used as an administrative and symbolic tool. During her tenure at Penn, Jane worked with numerous archaeological projects in Giza's western cemeteries, the New Kingdom temple complex of the pharaoh Ahmose at Abydos, the Middle Kingdom cemetery at Saqqara, the Middle Kingdom town of Wah-Sut dedicated to the cult of the pharaoh Senwosret III. Her own dissertation research was conducted at the Predynastic cemetery site of el-Amra, Upper Egypt, and was supported by a National Science Foundation Dissertation Enhancement Grant. Her survey uncovered a previously unknown settlement containing evidence of sealing practices, specialized production, and contact with the cultures of the southern Levant. Josef Wegner was her principle dissertation advisor and Kolb Senior Fellows David P. Silverman and Richard Zettler served on her advisory committee. Jane was awarded her doctorate in the spring of 2010. Her dissertation is entitled "Interregional Trade, Cultural Exchange and Specialized Production in the Late Predynastic: Archeological Analysis of el-Amra, Upper Egypt."

Currently, Jane is conducting a multi-year research project involving the large Predynastic Egyptian collection at the Penn Museum. She plans to return to el-Amra to conduct excavations of the settlement in 2012/13. Jane currently is adjunct faculty to the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Rowan University where she is conducting an interdisciplinary research project involving Predynastic human remains in the Penn Museum collection.

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John Holloran, Ph.D
History Department Chair, Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, Oregon
Elected: 1988 (Department of German Language and Literature, B.A.)

John was an undergraduate Kolb junior fellow. He earned his B.A. from Penn in 1990 in German Language and Literature, graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He went on to receive an M.A. in European History from the University of Virginia in 1994 and subsequently a Ph.D. in 2000 in Early Modern European Intellectual History. John is chair of the history department at Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon.

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Radu Ioviţă, Ph.D.
Research Scientist at the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz (RGZM)
Elected: 2007 (Department of Anthropology)

Radu received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2008, under the supervision of Senior Fellow Harold Dibble. His dissertation entitled "Ontogenetic Scaling in Stone Tools and its Application to European Middle Paleolithic Systematics," quantified and compared reduction trajectories in resharpened tools of the European Middle Paleolithic, with a specific focus on scrapers and bifaces from France, Germany, and the Ukraine. He completed his M.Phil. in archaeology at Cambridge with distinction in 2002, under the supervision of Paul Mellars. His research tested the hypothesis of migration from North Africa to the Levant, studying the technologies of the Dabban from Haua Fteah and the Emiran from Ksar Akil. The latter were studied as part of his undergraduate thesis under the supervision of Ofer Bar-Yosef at Harvard. Radu received an A.B. in Anthropology, graduating magna cum laude in 2001.

Radu is currently a research fellow at the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz (RGZM), coordinating two major projects: The Neandertal Projectile Technology Project (NeProTec), and the Lower Danube Survey Project (LoDanS). The first of these, funded by the German Research Foundation (RGZM overseen by P.I. Prof. Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser), and carried out in collaboration with the German Metrology Institute (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt; P.I. Dr. Frank Jäger), aims to elucidate macro- and microscopic breakage patterns on projectile points using controlled ballistic experiments where point shape, trajectory, and targets are held constant. At the same time, Radu is working in the field in Romania, carrying out an international collaborative survey project funded by the Max-Planck-Society. The aim of the survey is to test hypotheses about colonization routes into and out of Europe through a geomorphologically and paleoenvironmentally-informed archaeological survey. Radu is also interested in quantifying shape in lithic tools, especially with the aid of modern morphometric methods. He has published several papers on using Elliptical Fourier Analysis, including "Quantifying and Comparing Stone Tool Resharpening Trajectories with the Aid of Elliptical Fourier Analysis," in S. Lycett and P. Chauhan (eds.), New Perspectives on Old Stones: Analytical Approaches to Palaeolithic Technologies (Dordrect, The Netherlands: Springer/Kluwer, 2010), 235–53 and "Ontogenetic scaling and lithic systematics: method and application," Journal of Archaeological Science 36(7): 1447–57. He is currently applying Elliptical Fourier Analysis to assess variability in Aterian projectile points.

In addition to his research, Radu teaches prehistory at the University of Mainz. His last two courses were a practicum and seminar in lithic analysis and an introductory course in statistics for archaeologists. He is currently working on developing a course on anthropological approaches to archaeology and one on cognitive approaches.

Links:
http://sites.google.com/site/raduiovita/
http://rgzm.academia.edu/RaduIovita/
http://web.rgzm.de/856.html?L=1
http://lodans.wordpress.com
http://web.rgzm.de/fileadmin/gruppen/rgzm/2010/Iovita_in_Lycett2010.pdfhttp://web.rgzm.de/fileadmin/gruppen/rgzm/2009/Iovita_Article_Ontogenetic_Scaling.pdf

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Joshua Jeffers, Ph.D.
Elected: 2010 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Joshua graduated from Johnson University with a B.A. in Biblical Studies in 1999 and received a M.Div. from Emmanuel School of Religion in 2002 and a Th.M. from Princeton Theological Seminary in 2003. He studied Assyriology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Penn, successfully defending his dissertation, which was entitled "Tiglath-pileser I: A Light in a 'Dark Age'," in May 2013. In 2010 he received an American Academie Research Institute in Iraq award for his dissertation.

Joshua's dissertation research deals with textual material that has recently become available relating to Tiglath-Pileser I. He examined economic and historical cuneiform tablets that belong to Tiglath-pileser I and his immediate predecessors and successors. These allow him to consider the king's role as a transitioning figure from the Middle Assyrian territorial state of the second millennium to the Neo-Assyrian empire of the first. To this aim, he has conducted research at the Vorderasiatisches Museum in Berlin, which houses most of the primary documents from the Middle Assyrian period that were obtained by the German excavations of the city of Aššur in the early 1900s.

Joshua has presented several talks at Penn and the University of Delaware. He delivered a paper at the Barcelona meeting of the RAI in 2010 concerning the reliefs of Sennacherib. This research appears in the article, "Fifth Campaign Reliefs in Sennacherib's 'Palace Without Rival' at Nineveh," Iraq 73 (2011): 87–116. He also presented a paper, "The Assyrian Adoption of the Babylonian Luni-solar Calendrical System," at the 223rd American Oriental Society Meeting in Portland, Oregon, in March 2013.

Links:

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/

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Tarek Kahlaoui, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Islamic Art in Dept of Art History, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
Elected: 2002 (Department of the History of Art)

Tarek is currently an Assistant Professor of Islamic Art in the Department of Art History at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He graduated from Penn with a Ph.D. from the Department of the History of Art in 2008. His dissertation was entitled "The Depiction of the Mediterranean in Islamic Cartography (11th–16th centuries): The suras (Images) of the Mediterranean from the Bureaucrats to the Sea Captains."

Link:
http://arthistory.rutgers.edu/index.php

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Sarah Kurnick, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2011 (Department of Anthropology)

Sarah earned a B.A. in Anthropology from Haverford College in 2006 and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. She specializes in Mesoamerican archaeology and focuses on the creation and perpetuation of institutionalized social inequality. Her dissertation, "Negotiating the Contradictions of Political Authority: An Archaeological Case Study from Callar Creek, Belize," examines the strategies rulers use to acquire and maintain political authority and the reasons their followers choose to obey. To fund her dissertation research, Sarah received grants from the National Science Foundation and the American Philosophical Society.

Sarah is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, and in the spring will be an Assistant Adjunct Professor at Lehigh University. She is also starting a new archaeological project in Yucatan, Mexico, which will examine the role of the past in the operation of politically authoritative relationships among the Postclassic Maya. She has presented her research at numerous conferences and symposia, including the Belize Archaeology Symposium, the Yucatan in Pennsylvania Roundtable, and the Penn Maya Weekend. Her publications include "The Importance of the Past to the Ancient Maya Political Present: Recent Investigations at Callar Creek, Belize," published in Research Reports in Belizean Archaeology, and "Crossing Boundaries: Maya Censers from the Guatemala Highlands," published in Expedition. An edited volume manuscript, which Sarah contributed to and co-edited with Fellow Joanne Baron, is currently under review by the University Press of Colorado.

Links:
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3566312/
http://www.penn.museum/documents/publications/expedition/PDFs/51-1/Kurnick.pdf
http://penn.museum/documents/publications/expedition/PDFs/54-1/book-news.pdf

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Dawn Landua-McCormack, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of History, Middle Tennessee State University
Elected: 1998 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Dawn received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997. She graduated summa cum laude with distinction in Anthropology. She continued her education at Penn, earning her Ph.D. in 2008 from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Her major concentration was Egyptology with a minor in the Archaeology of Mesopotamia, and her dissertation was entitled "Dynasty XIII Kingship in Ancient Egypt: A Study of Political Power and Administration through an Investigation of the Royal Tombs of the Late Middle Kingdom." Her study examined the more than fifty kings who reigned in a period of approximately 150 years during Dynasty XIII, reviewing the chronological sequence of these kings and their means of legitimization and succession as well as the royal funerary monuments, which provide information regarding kingship at this time. Upon graduation from Penn, Dawn took a position at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where she is an Assistant Professor in the History Department.

Dawn has participated in several excavations in Egypt, beginning as a graduate student at Penn. She has been associated with projects in Abydos since 1996, and she is currently the Director of the Middle Tennessee State University South Abydos Mastabas Project, under the aegis of the University of Pennsylvania-Yale-Institute of Fine Arts Expedition to Abydos. This ongoing project, which includes both graduate and undergraduate students from MTSU, involves the excavation of a Dynasty XIII royal tomb. Dawn served as Historical Period Director for the Abydos Survey for Paleolithic Sites, University of Pennsylvania Museum Project at Abydos, which is directed by Dr. Harold Dibble, Senor Fellow, Dr. Shannon P. McPherron, and Dr. Deborah I. Olszewski. She continues to work on the material collected during this study.  She also served as Assistant Director, Field Director and Surveyor on the Yale Monastic Archaeology Project, undertaken by Yale University, and the White Monastery Project, Consortium for Research and Conservation at the Monasteries of the Sohag Region of Egypt.

Dawn's publications reflect her work in the field and her research on the funerary practices of Egyptian royalty. She has several recent articles, including: "The 2011 Season of the South Abydos Mastabas Project," Bulletin of the American Research Center in Egypt 200 (2012), 31–33;  "Reconstructing Economic and Political Problems from the Remains of Royal Tombs: Dynasty XIII of Ancient Egypt," Archaeological Review from Cambridge 26.1 (2011), 37–52; "New Archaeology at Ancient Scetis: EDMAP surveys and Excavations at the Monastery of St. John the Little in the Wadi al-Natrun (2006–2007)," Dumbarton Oaks Papers 64 (2010), 217–28 (with Stephen J. Davis, Darlene Brooks Hedstrom, Tomasz Herbich, and Gillian Pyke); "The Significance of Royal Funerary Architecture in the Study of  13th Dynasty Kingship," in M. Marée, ed., The Second Intermediate Period (13th–17th Dynasties), Current Research, Future Prospects, Belgium: Peeters Leuven, 2010, 69–84, pl. 5; "Establishing the Legitimacy of Kings in Dynasty XIII," in Zahi Hawass and Jennifer Houser Wegner, eds., Millions of Jubilees: Studies in Honor of David P. Silverman, Vol. 1, Cairo: Conseil Suprême des Antiquités de l'Égyptie, 2010, 375–85.

Dawn has also given numerous presentations based on her research. Most recently she participated in the AIA Meetings in Seattle in January 2013, presenting "Excavations at South Abydos, Egypt: Unlocking the Secrets of 13th Dynasty Kingship." In September 2012, she gave a paper, "The View from Above: Using Satellite Imagery to Reconstruct the Monastery of St. John the Little," at the International Congress of Coptic Studies in Rome. In the spring of 2012 she presented two papers: "The Excavation of an Ancient Egyptian King's Tomb: The Key to Unlocking the Secrets of a Turbulent Era" at the College of Liberal Arts Scholars Day, Scholars Week at Middle Tennessee State University in March and "Report of the 2003 and 2011 Seasons of the South Abydos Mastabas Project" at the Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt in Providence, Rhode Island, in April.

Link:
http://www.mtsu.edu/history/history_faculty_directory/McCormack.php

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Sarah Laursen, Ph.D.
Visiting Research Scholar, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU
Elected: 2008 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations)

Sarah Laursen graduated from New York University in 2002 with a double major in Art History and East Asian Studies. Following undergraduate internships in the Asian departments of the Brooklyn Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she joined a two-year inventory project in the Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard University. Sarah began her doctoral studies at the University of Pennsylvania in 2004, in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. While in Philadelphia, she taught Asian art courses at Temple University, Moore College of Art & Design, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and participated in public outreach programming linked to the 2011 Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition. In spring 2011, Sarah defended her dissertation, "Leaves that Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments from Northeast China," and received her Ph.D. in Chinese art history. In fall 2011, she returned to her alma mater to join NYU's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World as a two-year postdoctoral fellow. She presented her dissertation research in October in a public lecture at ISAW. Her work at ISAW, "Unearthing the Ancient Craft: The Art of Goldsmithing in Early Medieval China," expands on her dissertation topic and involves an investigation into the gold objects excavated throughout China and their relationship to the metalworking traditions of Inner Asia, the Mediterranean, and Mesopotamia.

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Justin Leidwanger, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Stanford University
Elected: 2008 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Justin earned a B.A. in Classics (2001) from Loyola University in Chicago, and an M.A. in Anthropology and Nautical Archaeology (2005) from Texas A&M University. In 2011 he was granted a Ph.D. from the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World graduate group at Penn. Justin's dissertation, "Maritime Archaeology as Economic History: Long-term Trends of Roman Commerce in the Northeast Mediterranean," examines Roman and Late Roman (1st- to 7th-century A.D.) economic networks using shipwrecks off southwest Turkey and Cyprus. After graduating, Justin was Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU (2011-12) and Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Art and the Aegean Material Culture Lab at the University of Toronto (2012-13) before taking up an appointment as Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at Stanford University.

Justin's research focuses primarily on the Roman maritime economy, especially shipwrecks, harbors, transport amphoras and other ceramics. As a Research Associate with the Institute of Nautical Archaeology since 2003, he directed surveys off Cyprus and served as INA's partner in several collaborative fieldwork and museum-based projects. In Turkey, he now co-directs the harbor explorations in conjunction with the Middle East Technical University project at Burgaz on the Datça peninsula. Most recently, he developed the Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project, a collaborative survey and excavation that incorporates maritime heritage outreach and museum and tourism development around the site of several wrecked merchant craft off the coast of Sicily, a project that was recently awarded an inaugural Cotsen Excavation Grant from the AIA.

As a Fellow of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center, Justin is also co-organizing (with Senior Fellow Richard Leventhal and two other colleagues) a three-part international workshop on underwater cultural heritage management titled "Who Owns Underwater Cultural Heritage? Perspectives on Archaeological Law and Ethics in the Mediterranean." Among his recent articles on this topic are two co-authored contributions to the American Journal of Archaeology and the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology focusing on ethical stewardship, responsible management, public involvement, and collaboration in maritime archaeological investigations.

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Matthew Liebmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University
Elected: 2002 (Department of Anthropology)

Matthew Liebmann is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. He has published research in American Anthropologist, the Journal of Field Archaeology, Kiva: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History, and Plains Anthropologist, and he is the author of Revolt: An Archaeological History of Pueblo Resistance and Revitalization in 17th Century New Mexico (University of Arizona Press, 2012) and co-editor of Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique (Altamira Press, 2008) and Enduring Conquests: Rethinking the Archaeology of Resistance to Spanish Colonialism in the Americas (SAR Press, 2011).

Matt received his B.A. in English and Theology from Boston College in 1996. Following his graduation he taught at Red Cloud High School on the Pine Ridge (Oglala Lakota) Indian Reservation before entering graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania. At Penn he was a William Penn Fellow and a member of the Kolb Society of Fellows. From 2003 to 2005 he worked as tribal archaeologist and NAGPRA program director at the Pueblo of Jemez Department of Resource Protection. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology in 2006, and was named a University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences Dean's Scholar. He won the Society for American Archaeology's Dissertation Award in 2007, when he was an Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary. He began teaching at Harvard in 2009, and was a William and Rita Clements Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America at Southern Methodist University in 2010. Matt lives in Boston, Massachusetts, and continues to collaborate on archaeological research with the Pueblo of Jemez.

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James R. Mathieu, Ph.D.
Chief of Staff to the Williams Director, Penn Museum
Elected: 1993 (Department of Anthropology)

Jim received a B.A. and M.A. from Penn in Anthropology in 1992. He then went on to achieve an M.A. in Medieval Archaeology from the University of York in 1995. His Ph.D. came from the Department of Anthropology at Penn in 2001, where he wrote his dissertation under the supervision of Bernard Wailes, one of the first Kolb Senior Fellows. Jim's dissertation, entitled "Assessing Political Complexity in Medieval England: An Analysis of Royal Buildings and Strategies," sought to understand medieval England's political development through an analysis of material remains. He argued that medieval England's political organization was represented by the approximately 650 royal buildings that existed between AD 1066 and 1650, and he provided an analysis of the royal strategies that pertained to these structures.

Jim is an anthropological and medieval archaeologist who specializes in the study of social complexity, spatial analysis, fortifications, and experimental archaeology. His research interests, publications, and field experience include work in England, Wales, Ireland, France, Italy, Ukraine, Syria, Tunisia, Guatemala, Belize, and the United States. A former Editor of Penn Museum's Expedition magazine, he now oversees the Museum's collections staff (archivists, conservators, keepers, and registrars), publications program (monographs and Expedition), and digital media center (website and digital media content development, digitization lab, and photo studio) as the Chief of Staff to the Williams Director of the Penn Museum.

Jim has published in a wide variety of formats. He served as the editor of Penn Museum's magazine Expedition from 2004 to 2008, and has contributed articles, most recently the co-authored "From the Archives: Is Your Mind Ready for Adventure? Expedition Turns 50," Expedition 50(3): 6–16. He recently co-wrote "Defensibility and Settlement Patterns in the Guatemalan Maya Highlands" in Latin American Antiquity 18.2 (2007): 191–211. Jim has edited Penn Museum's annual report since 2007. He has edited two volumes: Experimental Archaeology: Replicating Past Objects, Behaviors, and Processes BAR International Series 1035 (Oxford) in 2002 and Exploring the Role of Analytical Scale in Archaeological Interpretation BAR International Series 1261 (Oxford) in 2004 with Fellow Rachel E. Scott. He has also published: "Medieval Royal Buildings" in Robin A. Butlin, ed., Historical Atlas of North Yorkshire, 2003: 82–5, and several co-authored articles on the field research of the Akkerman Fortress in Ukraine.

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Susanna McFadden, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Art History and Music, Fordham University
Elected: 2004 (Department of the History of Art)

Susanna earned her B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1998. She received her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007. Her field of interest is the art, architecture, and archaeology of Late Antiquity, specializing in wall paintings of the Mediterranean region and early medieval Islamic art. Susanna's dissertation, "Courtly Places and Sacred Spaces: The Social and Political Significance of Monumental Wall Painting in Late Antiquity," examined three different architectural complexes with monumental painted figural programs as case studies: 1) a series of frescoes from the Tetrarchic period of Roman Egypt (late 3rd century CE) decorating an imperial cult chamber in the Pharaonic Temple of Luxor, 2) the so-called Domus Faustae, an early 4th century CE imperial domicile in Rome containing a painted procession depicting the family of Constantine the Great, and 3) Qusayr 'Amra, an Islamic monument of the Umayyad period (c. 724–743) in the Jordanian Desert, with paintings decorating the interior surface of a bath house/audience hall. These sites and their paintings were contextualized (historically, architecturally and topographically) in order to illuminate the powerful role visual communication played in the practice of late antique politics and culture. In 2008 Susanna joined the Department of Art History and Music at Fordham University, where she is also on the faculty of the Center for Medieval Studies. In 2009–2010 she won the Lily Auchincloss Post-Doctoral Rome Prize for her project "Articulating Power and Status in Late Antique Rome: A Study of Late Roman Pictorial Constellations" from the American Academy in Rome.

Since 2005 Susanna has also been a member of the team excavating the late Roman site of Amheida in Egypt's Dakhleh Oasis, a project sponsored by New York University (http://www.amheida.org.)

Forthcoming publications include, The Art of Maintaining an Empire: Roman Paintings in the Temple of Luxor (edited with Michael Jones), ARCE Conservation Series/Yale University Press; "Art on the Edge: The Late Roman Wall Paintings of Amheida, Egypt." In atti di XI Colloquio Internazionale dell'AIPMA (L'Associazione Internazionale per la Pittura Murale Antica), Efeso, dal 14 – 18 settembre, 2010; "When Image Divorces Text: The Late Antique Megalographia from the so-called Domus Faustae in Rome," in Memoires of the American Academy in Rome.

Links:
http://www.fordham.edu/academics/programs_at_fordham_/art_history_and_musi/faculty__staff/dr_susanna_mcfadden_69355.asp
http://www.amheida.org
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoFl6TiOMmI

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Leslee Michelsen, Ph.D.
Head of the Curatorial and Research Department at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar
Elected: 2007 (Department of the History of Art)

Leslee graduated from Hood College in 1997 with degrees in Art History and French. Her doctoral dissertation in the Art History Department at the University of Pennsylvania was entitled "'To Lift the Veil from the Face of Depiction': Figural Imagery and Visual Culture in Early Islamic Central Asia," and was successfully defended in June 2011. Leslee is currently the Head of the Curatorial and Research Department at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar.

She has excavated in Qatar, Israel, Turkey, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Afghanistan, where she conducted dissertation field research and consulted on a number of Islamic parchaeology and conservation projects as a volunteer with the Turquoise Mountain Foundation in Kabul. She is currently the Finds Supervisor and Co-Assistant Director for the Ancient Merv Project of UCL.

Leslee has lectured at Kabul University, Hood College, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the American University of Paris on her research. She has taught Islamic art history at Parsons Paris School of Art and Design as well as the Turquoise Mountain Foundation School in Kabul. Her published work includes articles on the history of Islamic calligraphy in Afghanistan, mina'i ware ceramics, and Saljuq stucco as well as the catalogue for an exhibition that she curated, entitled: Ferozkoh: Tradition and Continuity in Afghan Art, which premiered at MIA Doha in the spring of 2013, and opened in Leighton House Museum in London in the autumn of 2013. She is currently working on several projects including: narrative in Islamic art, jewellery from south-east Asia, and Bamiyan ceramics.

Links:
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/
http://http://www.mia.org.qa/
http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/subsites/nour/events/exhibitions/ferozkoh.aspx

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Bryan Miller, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Associate, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at Bonn University
Elected: 2006 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations)

Bryan received his M.A. in archaeology from the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA in 2000 and his Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009. His dissertation, entitled "Power Politics in the Xiongnu Empire," collected evidence of elite strategies used to maintain authority through control of prestige goods networks and monumental constructions in the Xiongnu empire (3rd century BC–1st century AD) of Mongolia. Bryan received a Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS dissertation grant to conduct his research in Mongolian and North China. After graduating, he was an ACMS Research Fellow (funded by the Luce Foundation) and Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum. He was also a Visiting Professor in the History Department at Rowan University. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and hosted at the University of Bonn in Germany. His research focuses on the emergence of empires in China and Mongolia and related social change. He examines the nature of hinterland communities and the relationships of individual locales with the development of imperial polities.

While a graduate student Bryan began research in Taiwan and Mongolia and managed the Xiongnu excavations portion of the Khanuy Valley Project. He is a co-director of the Mongol-American Khovd Archaeology Project, collaborating with the National Museum of Mongolia, which conducted excavations from 2006-2010. This project focuses on the peoples and cultures of the Mongolian Altai Mountains adjacent to present-day northwest China and Kazakhstan. Bryan's research investigates several burial grounds of the Xiongnu in the Altai Mountains, including excavations of full tomb complexes at a "royal" cemetery in the foothills of the Altai and a small hinterland burial ground up in the mountains.

In 2008 Bryan co-organized the International Conference on Xiongnu Archaeology in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He has also delivered several lectures including "Mobile Communities and Archaeological Analyses of Ancient Steppe Polities" in 2010 and "Reconstructing the Hunnu Empire through History, Archaeology, and Ethnography" in 2008 at the American Center for Mongolian Studies. Recently he presented "Negotiating the Frontier: Cultural Politics and the Southern Xiongnu" at the Political Strategies of Identity Building in Non-Han Empires in China Workshop at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. This fall he will participate in the Kolb Senior Scholars Colloquium.

Bryan's publications include Xiongnu Archaeology: Multidisciplinary Perspectives of the First Steppe Empire of Inner Asia, Bonn Contributions to Asian Archaeology 5, Bonn: Bonn University Press (2011), which he co-edited with U. Brosseder, and several articles such as "Permutations of Peripheries in the Xiongnu Empire," in the Xiongnu Archaeology volume; and co-authored articles "Xiongnu Constituents in the High Mountains – Results of the Mongol-American Khovd Archaeology Project, 2008," The Silk Road 7.1 (2009): 8–20; and "Elite Xiongnu Burials at the Periphery: Tomb Complexes at Tahiltin-hotgor, Mongolian Altai," in J. Bemmann, H. Parzinger, E. Pohl, and D. Tseveendorj, eds., Current Archaeological Research in Mongolia: Papers from the First International Conference on Archaeological Research in Mongolia, Bonn: Bonn University Press, 2009, 301–14. His present papers for publication include articles on globalized consumption and exotica in early East Asia and the political substrata of the Xiongnu empire.

Links:
http://www.silkroadfoundation.org/excavation/takhiltcemetary.html
http://silkroadfoundation.org/archaeology/khovd/

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Emily B Modrall, Ph.D.
Elected: 2007 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Emily received her B.A. from the University of Michigan in 2001 in Classical Archaeology, graduating magna cum laude with Highest Class Honors. She was also Phi Beta Kappa. She earned her M.Phil. in Classics in 2003 from the University of Cambridge–Trinity Hall. She has recently graduated from Penn, earning her Ph.D. in 2011 from the Graduate Group in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Her dissertation was entitled "Indigenous Identities in Punic Western Sicily," and her advisor was Jeremy McInerney. In addition to the Kolb Fellowship, during her graduate career Emily was awarded a Fulbright Grant for study in Italy in 2007–2008 and a Salvatori Research Award for the summers of 2005–2007 and the spring of 2011.

Emily's research interests encompass Phoenicio-Punic island settlement and regional economic networks in Sicily, Sardinia, and the western Mediterranean between the Iron Age and the Hellenistic period; Late Classical-Roman Republican rural settlement in the central/western Mediterranean; cultural contact and community identity in multi-ethnic contexts; and cultural heritage and the law. Her current fieldwork projects include the Colonial Landscape Project in Campobasso – Isernia, Italy (affiliated with the University of Leiden), the Terralba Rural Settlement Project in Terralba, Sardinia (associated with the universities of Valencia and Glasgow), and the Marsala Hinterland Survey in Marsala, Sicily (under the auspices of the University of Arizona). Emily has presented papers on her research in the United States, in Italy, and elsewhere in Europe, including "Defining 'Punicization' in Indigenous Western Sicily: Economy and Identity in the Material Record of the Fourth Century BCE," for the AAMW lecture series at Penn and "Cistern Complexes in Inland Western Sicily: New Water Supplies in the Fourth Century BCE," at the European Association of Archaeologists 16th Annual Meeting held in the Netherlands.

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Antonio J. Morales, Ph.D.
Lecturer and Research Associate, Ägyptologisches Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Elected: 2008 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Antonio received his B.A. in Archaeology from the University of Seville, Spain, in 1997. Later he studied Egyptology in England at the Universities of London (UCL) and Birmingham, as well as in Germany at the Freie Universität of Berlin. At Penn he studied Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, receiving his Ph.D. in 2013. His main areas of interest include Egyptian religion, ritual, particularly mortuary corpora, beliefs, and practices, magic, priesthood, literature, and kingship. Antonio's dissertation title is "The Transmission of the Pyramid Texts into the Middle Kingdom: Cultural and Philological Aspects of a Continuous Mortuary Tradition." He has been a postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Ägyptologisches Institut at the University of Heidelberg, where he has participated in the project SFB 933 "Materiale Textkulturen," conducting research on the composition and transmission of religious texts in the pyramids of Egyptian queens in the Old Kingdom. He is currently Lecturer and Research Associate at the Ägyptologisches Institut of the Freie Universität Berlin, where he teaches Egyptian language and conducts research on the transmission and reception of religious texts in first millennium B.C.E Egypt (research project SFB 980 "Episteme in Bewegung").

Antonio has participated in several excavations in Egypt at Abydos, El-Amra, Saqqara, and Thebes as archaeologist and epigrapher. In 1998, he volunteered as a research assistant at the Department of Egyptian Antiquities in the British Museum, London. In 2002, he received the Prize of the Spanish Association of Egyptology for his study "Doorways and Guardians of the Egyptian Netherworld," and later he received the William Penn Fellowship at Penn (2002–2007), the Kolb Fellowship (2007–2008), and the Freie Universität Berlin Stipendium for graduate studies in Germany (2008–2009). Furthermore, he has recently received The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship for conducting research at the University of Oxford (2009–2010), the J.R. Koury Endowment Fellowship (2010–2011), the Research Visiting Fellowship in Cultural and Intellectual History at the University of London, School of Advanced Studies–Warburg Institute (2011), and the DAAD fellowship for postdoctoral studies at Bonn Universität (2013). In addition, Antonio (along with Junior Fellow Melinda Nelson-Hurst) was awarded the Summer 2010 GAPSA-Provost Award for their research topic "On Kinship and Inheritance in Pharaonic Egypt."

Antonio has published several articles in peer-review journals and chapters to books. In 2001 he edited a book on the production and use of beer in ancient cultures, and has co-edited with Fellow Dr. Jane Hill and Dr. Philip Jones (Penn Museum, Babylonian Section) a multicultural and interdisciplinary conference volume Experiencing Power, Generating Authority: Cosmos, Politics, and the Ideology of Kingship in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, published by the University of Pennsylvania Museum Press in December 2013. In addition, he has taught in the Department of Ancient History at the University of Seville in 2011–2012 and is currently teaching at Freie Universität Berlin. He has given papers at international conferences and congresses in the United States, Germany, Netherlands, England, Czech Republic, Portugal, and Spain.

He is currently working on the publication of his study on the transmission of the Pyramid Texts into the Middle Kingdom (2014), the reception of religious texts in Heliopolitan and Theban tombs during the Late Period (2015), and the dissemination of a particular group of texts relating to the sky goddess Nut from the Old Kingdom to Greco-Roman times (2015).

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/
http://www.orinst.ox.ac.uk/
http://www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/e/aegyptologie/index.html
http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/
http://www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/e/aegyptologie/mitarbeiter/wissenschaftliche_Mitarbeiter/Morales/index.html

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Ellen Morris, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Classics and Ancient Studies Department, Barnard College
Elected: 1995 (Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies)


Stephennie Mulder, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Art History, University of Texas, Austin
Elected: 2002 (Department of the History of Art)

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Melinda G. Nelson-Hurst, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Department of Anthropology; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Studies, Tulane University
Elected: 2010 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Melinda completed a B.A. at Brandeis University in both History and Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, magna cum laude, in 2001, receiving the Chassler Prize and election into Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society upon graduation. She has recently completed her Ph.D. in Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation is entitled "Ideology and Practicality in Transmission of Office during the Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt: An Examination of Families and the Concept of i3t" and was supervised by Kolb Senior Fellow David P. Silverman. Her dissertation examines the means through which officials transferred their positions to one another (i.e., whether through inheritance, family influence, legal transaction, one's merit, or a combination of methods) and how these methods may have changed over the span of the Middle Kingdom. The largest part of her study is prosopographical and includes a large number of family case studies. Through examining the positions held by family members, the prosopographical analysis exposes trends involving titles passed down through generations, family spheres of influence within particular sectors of the administration, and the various positions held among siblings. The dissertation also examines the Egyptian word for office (i3t) through a lexicographical study of the term's usage during the Middle Kingdom. Due to the predominantly literary/biographical nature of the texts in which the word i3t appears, the lexicographical study paints a picture of the ideology behind the concept of office, while the prosopographical study exposes the more practical realities of transferring positions.

Melinda was awarded a Samuel H. Kress, History of Art Institutional Fellowship through the American Research Center in Egypt for 2007–2008. Along with Junior Fellow Antonio Morales, she received the summer 2010 GAPSA-Provost Award for Interdisciplinary Innovation for their research topic "On Kinship and Inheritance in Pharaonic Egypt." They are currently preparing their study of the Egyptian words for "heir" and "inheritance" during the Old and Middle Kingdoms for presentation and publication. Melinda has also presented at international Egyptology conferences and published articles on the topic of family roles and their shift during the late Middle Kingdom and Second Intermediate Period, as well as contributed to the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Ancient History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). In addition, she has served as an excavator and surveyor at the sites of South Abydos and el-Amra in Egypt. Her research interests include social history, political history, administration, funerary practices, and family structures and genealogies.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/
http://upenn.academia.edu/MelindaNelsonHurst

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Lada Onyshkevych, Ph.D.
Elected: 1987 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

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Federico A. Paredes-Umana, Ph.D.
Elected: 2006 (Department of Anthropology)

Federico received his undergraduate degree from San Carlos University, Guatemala in 2005. He is a student in the Anthropology department and his concentration is on Mesoamerican Archaeology. Federico was elected a Kolb junior fellow in 2006 and works under the advise of Prof. Robert Sharer, who is an emeritus fellow.

Federico conducts fieldwork in the locality of Ataco, Ahuachapán, a little explored area of Western El Salvador. Federico's dissertation is based on his fieldwork at a late Preclassic site. He has also given several papers based on his research: a co-authored paper entitled "Portable-XRF Elemental Analysis of Archaeological Sediments: Some Examples from Mesoamerica," given at the Buffalo XRF meetings, in July 2010. In the spring of 2011 he delivered a paper entitled "A Public Funeral Covered With Ilopango (Tbj) Ash In Western El Salvador" at the SAA annual meeting in Sacramento, and he presented a talk at Penn Museum's Maya Weekend on the Jaguar Head Core Zone in western El Salvador.

Federico has also developed a website (www.atacoantiguo.com). The website is directed to the general public and highlights indigenous contributions to the cultural heritage of El Salvador. The site contains 3D animations of the Prehispanic cultural landscape in western El Salvador as well as academic papers and press articles discussing the two years of fieldwork undertaken by the Ataco Archaeological Project. The website is fueled by academic research conducted during 2006–2011 that focused on the complex societies of Mesoamerican tradition grouped in the "Jaguar Head Core Zone." The Jaguar Head Core Zone is an original contribution to Mesoamerican scholarship and can best be defined as a territory of over 3000sqkm in Western El Salvador where early Maya societies crafted a cultural landscape and synthesized several Mesoamerican traditions to a local symbolism expressed by the stone monuments known as Jaguar Heads. Scholars have recognized the Jaguar Head style since the beginning of the twentieth century, but only nine monuments had been adequately published as of 2006. Since then Federico has documented the provenience and locations of over 50 monuments, with photographs and the excellent drawings by Salvadoran artist Daniel Salazar. The Ataco Archaeological Project documented the long tradition of veneration and use of Jaguar Head monuments since the Preclassic Period (400–200 B.C.). Archaeological investigations also documented their re-use several centuries later (ca. 1000 A.D.) in a ritual of memory and pilgrimage in the Highland Sierra Apaneca-Ilamatepec.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/
http://www.atacoantiguo.com

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Bratislav Pantelic, Ph.D.
Faculty Member, History of Art Department, Sabanci University, Turkey
Elected: 1988 (Department of the History of Art)

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Wade Patterson, M.A.
Project Coordinator, Sawmill Community Land Trust
Elected: (Department of Anthropology, B.A.; Department of Folklore and Folklife, M.A.)

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Julia Perratore
Lecturer, Department of the History of Art, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2008 (
Department of the History of Art)

Julia is a graduate student in the History of Art at Penn. She received her B.A. in Art History from New York University. Her primary area of interest is twelfth-century sculpture in Northern Spain. Julia spent the 2008–2009 academic year in Spain with the assistance of a Travel Fellowship from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. There she researched her dissertation on the Romanesque architectural sculpture of Santa María de Uncastillo, a twelfth-century church in Aragón with a rich cache of imagery that reflects the medieval experience of conquest and community building. Her dissertation is entitled "Romanesque on the Frontier: the Architectural Sculpture of Santa María de Uncastillo." She continued her archival research and on-site study during the fall of 2009 with a Research Grant from the Program for Cultural Cooperation between Spain's Ministry of Culture and United States Universities. In 2010 she received a Fulbright research grant for study in Spain, where she continued her fieldwork in Uncastillo. Julia's broader interest in the Mediterranean region has also led to research on the art and architecture of medieval Pisa, carried out in conjunction with the Kunsthistoriches Institut in Florenz – Max Planck Institut.

Julia has had a number of opportunities to deliver papers on her research. In April 2010, she presented part of her dissertation at the Penn History of Art colloquium. She has also discussed her work on Romanesque images of the Jewish community of Uncastillo at a conference held at the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Madrid, and presented a study of artistic exchange across the Pyrenees at the Université de Toulouse II - le Mirail. For the summer of 2012 Julia has a curatorial fellowship in medieval art at the Glencairn Museum.

Links:
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/

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Aubrey Baadsgaard Poffenberger, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
Elected: 2006 (Department of Anthropology)

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Benjamin Porter, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Elected: 2001 (Department of Anthropology)

Benjamin is an Assistant Professor of Near Eastern archaeology in Berkeley's Near Eastern Studies Department and curator of Near Eastern archaeology at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum. Prior to his appointment at Berkeley, he taught at Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology in 2007.  His dissertation, entitled "The Archaeology of Community in Iron I Central Jordan," investigated agro-pastoral settlements of the Iron I period (1200–1000 BCE) in the Southern Levant using a community framework. His current research interests include the archaeology of ancient Near Eastern social life, ancient materials and technologies, and Near Eastern archaeology's intellectual history.

He co-directs the Dhiban Excavation and Development Project (www.dhiban.org) in Jordan, which investigates how agro-pastoral communities, often living under empire, used technologies to organize agricultural and craft production in the region's semi-arid, resource-scarce environment. He also co-directs the Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project with Kolb Fellow Dr. Alexis Boutin of Sonoma State University. This project is researching and publishing the skeletal evidence and artifacts from Peter B. Cornwall's 1941 expedition to Bahrain and Eastern Saudi Arabia.

Benjamin's recent publications include: "The Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project: A First Look at the Peter B. Cornwall Collection at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology," Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy 23 (2012): 35–49 (co-authored with Fellow Alexis Boutin); "Face-to-face with the Past: Reconstructing a Teenage Boy from Early Dilmun," Near Eastern Archaeology 75/2 (2012): 68–79 (co-authored with Fellow Alexis Boutin, Sabrina Sholts, and Gloria Nusse); "Feeding the Community: Objects, Scarcity, and Commensality in the Early Iron Age Southern Levant," Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 24/1 (2011): 27–54; "Dry Dig: Ethics and Alcohol in Middle Eastern Archaeological Practice," Society for American Archaeology's Archaeological Record 10/5 (2010): 7–11; "Authority, Polity, and Tenuous Elites in Iron Age Edom (Jordan)," Oxford Journal of Archaeology 23/4(2004): 373–95.

He is also co-editing with Alexis Boutin Remembering and Commemorating the Dead: Recent Contributions in Bioarchaeology and Mortuary Archaeology from the Ancient Near East. This book, to be published by the University of Colorado Press, presents case studies exploring how ancient Near Eastern societies memorialized their dead. A book manuscript tentatively entitled Complex Communities: The Archaeology of Early Iron Age West-Central Jordan is in press with the University of Arizona Press and will be published next year. He recently started writing a new book exploring the role of Near Eastern archaeology in the contemporary Middle East.

Benjamin teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses at Berkeley. He mentors undergraduates through the Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program, providing opportunities for them to participate in field and laboratory research. In addition he directs an archaeological field school on his Dhiban Project in Jordan where students learn archaeological excavation and survey techniques. He has organized several conferences and workshops at Berkeley, including the 2011 annual meetings of the Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) USA (Theme: Archaeology of and in the Contemporary World) and The Berkeley Memory and Identity Working Group from 2009 to 2012. This fall he will be a speaker at the Kolb Senior Scholars Colloquium with Alexis Boutin.

Links:
http://nes.berkeley.edu/Web_Porter/Welcome.html
http://escholarship.org/uc/search?creator=Porter,%20Benjamin%20W
http://berkeley.academia.edu/BenjaminPorter
http://dhiban.org

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Jon Pressman, Ph.D.
Product Director, Viibryd at Forest Laboratories, New York
Elected: 1991 (Department of Anthropology)

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Teresa P. Raczek, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Anthropology, Kennesaw State University, Georgia 
Elected: 2001 (Department of Anthropology)

 

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John Henry Rice, Ph.D.
Associate Curator of South Asian and Islamic Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia 
Elected: 2005 (Department of the History of Art)

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Joshua Roberson, Ph.D.
Faculty Member, Department of History, Philosophy and Political Science, Camden County College, New Jersey 
Elected: 2001 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Josh received his Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Pennsylvania in Egyptology, with a minor in Cuneiform Studies. His dissertation, "The Book of the Earth: A Study of Ancient Egyptian Symbol-Systems and the Evolution of New Kingdom Cosmographic Models," was supervised by Senior Fellow David P. Silverman. Josh's B.A. (1997) is from the University of North Texas, where he majored in Anthropology with a minor program in Philosophy. Currently Josh is an Assistant Professor of History at Camden County College in Blackwood, New Jersey, a position he has held since 2011. He serves as the Projects Coordinator and Grant Writer for the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility in Blackwood. He is also a Consulting Scholar in the Egyptian Section at the Penn Museum. Previously, he was a Lecturer in Egyptology at Penn and a Lecturer in History and Anthropology at the University of North Texas in Denton. In 2008 he received the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) fellowship. While a graduate student at Penn he was awarded, in addition to the Kolb, the Arts and Sciences Dissertation Fellowship (2006–2007) and the Felix J. Korsyn Prize in Egyptology (2006).

Josh's research centers on the art and literature of ancient Egypt. He has worked as an epigrapher for the Penn Expedition to Saqqâra, Egypt, led by Senior Fellow David Silverman; a sigillographer and epigrapher for the Penn Expedition to Abydos, Egypt, led by Dr. Josef Wegner; and the chief sigillographer for the French-Egyptian expedition (CNRS/CFEETK) to the Opet precinct of Karnak temple in Luxor, Egypt. His conference contributions and invited lectures indicate his fieldwork and research interests. In 2010 he presented "The Secret History of Karnak Temple: Civil Administration and Sigillography in Middle Kingdom Thebes" and "(Re)-imagining the Underworld: Textual Transmission, Art, and Architecture at el-Asasif Necropolis" at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He has consistently presented papers at the Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, including most recently, "The Awakening of Osiris: Interpretations and Observations on a Recalcitrant Sequence of Cryptographic Texts" in 2012. Josh also works to further public interest in Egyptology. He served as a commentator and co-host for the television documentary "Under the Pyramids," produced by Discovery and the BBC. In 2012, he spearheaded the lecture series "Beyond the Pyramids: An Introduction to the Religion and Culture of Ancient Egypt," and is currently the organizer of "Hidden Histories of Ancient Egypt" on behalf of the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility in Blackwood, New Jersey.

Josh's many publications reflect the breadth of his research. He has recently published The Ancient Egyptian Books of the Earth, Wilbour Studies in Egypt and Ancient Western Asia, Vol. 1, Atlanta: Lockwood Press & Brown University, 2012. In addition, he is a contributing author to Le parvis du temple d'Opet à Karnak. Exploration archéologique (2006–2007), Cairo: IFAO, also published in 2012. He authored the chapter "A Good Burial" for C. Routledge, ed., Quest for Immortality, The Bolton Collection, Taipei, China: Media Sphere and United Exhibits Group, 2011, 244–253. His numerous articles include "A New Nautical Idiom for Hoisting Sails (in the Underworld)?" Göttinger Miszellen 233 (2012), 43–50; in 2011, "The Trampled Foe: Two New Examples of a Rare Amuletic Form," Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 96 (2010), 219–222; in 2010, "A Solar Litany from the Tomb of Ramesses IX," Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 45 (2009), 227–232; "Observations on the So-called 'sw sm=f,' or Middle Egyptian Proclitic Pronoun Construction," in Z. Hawass and Jennifer Wegner, eds., Millions of Jubilees: Studies in Honor of David P. Silverman, SASAE 39 (2009), Cairo: SCA, Vol. 2, 185–205; and  "The Early History of 'New Kingdom' Netherworld Iconography: A Late Middle Kingdom Apotropaic Wand Reconsidered," in D.P. Silverman, W.K. Simpson, and Josef Wegner, eds., Archaism and Innovation: Studies in the Culture of Middle Kingdom Egypt, New Haven and Philadelphia: Yale and University of Pennsylvania, 2009, 427–445.

Link:
http://camdencc.academia.edu/JoshuaRoberson

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Cynthia Robinson, Ph.D.
Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of History of Art, Cornell University
Elected: 1987 (Department of the History of Art)

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Matthew Rutz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies, Brown University
Elected: 2004 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

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Kelcy Sagstetter, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Oberlin College
Elected: 2011 (Ancient History Graduate Group)

Kelcy earned her B.A. in Classics and Ancient History from the University of Texas at Austin, followed by an M.A. in Latin Literature at Boston University. She received her Ph.D. from the Ancient History graduate group at Penn, with her dissertation entitled "Solon of Athens: The Man, the Myth, the Tyrant?" She has conducted fieldwork all over the world, including underwater survey at Episkopi Bay and Cape Greco on Cyprus, and has excavated at Villa Magna in Italy, Olbia in Ukraine, and worked as a trench supervisor at Corinth. She has participated in field survey in central Lydia, and worked at Eleusis on the Eleusis 3D Archaeological Imaging Project.

Kelcy spent two years at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. In 2009–2010, she was a Regular Member thanks to generous funding from the John Williams White Fellowship. She spent the 2010–2011 academic year as the Edward Capps Student Associate Fellow. While in Athens, she examined the stone containing the inscription of Drakon's Law on Homicide in the Epigraphic Museum, using a Breuckmann SmartSCAN HE 3D scanner to create a submillimeter resolution data set in order to produce more detailed images of the stone's exterior. She is currently engaged in processing the data using a range of software tools including OptoCat, RapidForm and GIS to develop new, precise, and varied methods for analysis of the stele's surface and to determine whether additional text can be deciphered. Kelcy has undertaken this project in conjunction with the Center for Advanced Spatial Technology at the University of Arkansas, where she is currently a CAST fellow, and is in the process of preparing a joint publication on the results.

Links
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/anch/
http://cast.uark.edu/home.html
http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/Spiffs/excavations-in-the-nezi-field-in-ancient-corinth-2010/

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Teagan Schweitzer, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2008 (Department of Anthropology)

Teagan earned her B.A. in Anthropology with honors from Michigan University in 2002, after spending her junior year studying at Cambridge University. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2010. While at Penn she was awarded several research fellowships including a Winterthur Research Fellowship and a fellowship from the Program in Early American Economy and Society (PEAES), as well as a William Penn Fellowship, in addition to being named a Kolb junior fellow. Teagan now teaches the Introduction to Archaeology course at Penn. She also is a consulting zooarchaeologist for URS Corporation, an engineering company based in Burlington, NJ.

Teagan's research interests include food and foodways, the anthropology of food, zooarchaeology, and historical archaeology. Her dissertation was entitled "Philadelphia Foodways ca. 1750–1850: An Historical Archaeology of Cuisine." She has published "Thoughts on Ethnic Foodways and Identity," Repast 21/2 (2005): 3; "The Turtles of Philadelphia's Culinary Past," Expedition 51 (2009): 3; and "Catfish, Waffles, and Coffee: A Historical Philadelphia Icon," Penn Appetit 6 (2010): 14–15. She has participated in fieldwork in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Hawaii, Kenya, and Bolivia. In 2012, Teagan received an Upton Foundation Fellowship from the William L. Clements Library in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to conduct research on "Defining American Cuisine: An Exploration of American Identity Through Examination of Early American Foodways."

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Rachel E. Scott, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Anthropology Department, DePaul University
Elected: 1998 (Department of Anthropology)

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Page Selinsky, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2000 (Department of Anthropology)

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Julia L. Shear, Ph.D.
Onassis Visiting Instructor, Department of History at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul
Elected: 1998 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Julia is an historian of ancient Greece and an archaeologist with a particular interest in the ancient city of Athens. She is currently an Onassis Visiting Instructor in the Department of History at Boğaziçi University in Istanbul where she teaches ancient Greek history and classical archaeology. As an undergraduate, Julia studied Classics at Harvard University and spent a semester in Rome at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies. After she graduated, she spent a year in Athens where, as the John Williams White Fellow, she did the regular program of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Julia then came to the University of Pennsylvania in the first class of students in the Graduate Group of Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Interested already both in history and in archaeology, she wrote her doctoral dissertation on the history and development of the Panathenaia, the most important religious festival in ancient Athens. Part of this project was supported by the Kolb Foundation, after Julia was elected a Junior Fellow in 1998. Having completed her doctoral degree, she spent four years in Cambridge as a postdoctoral researcher on the AHRB Anatomy of Cultural Revolution Project, which was jointly located in the Faculty of Classics at the University of Cambridge and King's College. Subsequently, she taught at the University of Glasgow for four years and then was in Athens for four years as a Senior Associate Member of the American School of Classical Studies. Julia has excavated extensively in Greece, Cyprus, and Italy.

In her research, Julia uses both written evidence and material culture to provide a holistic picture of Athenian society and culture. She is particularly interested in how the Athenians remembered and responded to the city's past(s). These issues played an important part in how the Athenians responded publicly to the oligarchic revolutions at the end of the fifth century B.C. when oligarchs twice overthrew the democracy, as she has discussed in her book Polis and Revolution: Responding to Oligarchy in Classical Athens (Cambridge, 2011). It focuses particularly on the recreation of democracy and the city, both ritually and physically, in the aftermath of these coups and on how these revolutions were remembered and forgotten. Julia's book was shortlisted for the Runciman Award 2012. The politics of Athenian collective or social memory is a related area of interest for Julia and she has plans in the future to write a book about these processes. Her main current research focuses on Athenian religion, especially the Panathenaia, and she is writing a book about how the festival was a place for constructing Athenian identities and how it affected those identities. This work develops directly out of her doctoral dissertation. She also works extensively on Athenian inscriptions, documents carved on stone and so made public, and they appear in many of her articles and in her book. She focuses on them not only as texts of documents, but also as monuments in their own right that belong in a particular spatial setting and context.

Links:
http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/
http://www.classics.cam.ac.uk/
http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item1173609/?site_locale=en_GB
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item1174671/?site_locale=en_GB
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item5744227/?site_locale=en_GB
http://ascsa.academia.edu/JuliaLShear

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Karen Sonik, Ph.D
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, UCLA
Elected: 2006 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

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Miranda Suri, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Anthropology, Queens College 
Elected: 2004 (Department of Anthropology)

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Christopher P. Thornton, Ph.D.
Program Officer, Committee for Research and Exploration, National Geographic Society
Elected: 2002 (Department of Anthropology)

Chris earned his A.B. from Harvard University in Archaeometry and Archaeology, graduating in 2001. He received an M.Phil. in World Prehistory: Southern and Eastern Europe from the University of Cambridge in 2002 before entering the Anthropology department at Penn. He graduated from Penn in 2009 with a Ph.D. in Anthropology; his dissertation was entitled, "The Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Metallurgy of Tepe Hissar, Northeastern Iran: A Challenge to the 'Levantine Paradigm'." For this work, Chris analyzed different forms of metallurgical craft production in domestic and workshop contexts at the Chalcolithic site of Tepe Hissar in Northeastern Iran. While at Penn he received several awards including an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (2002–2005), a White-Levy Grant for Archaeological Publications, Co-P.I. (2006–2008), and was elected to the Kolb Fellowship in 2002. Following graduation, Chris taught for a year at George Mason University in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, but since 2010 has been the Program Officer for the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society.

Chris's research interests include craft production (especially metallurgy and ceramics), social complexity, monumentality, non-traditional forms of urbanism, and the application of archaeological science. He has excavated at Mapungubwe in South Africa, Sotira Kaminoudhia in Cyprus, Szazhalombatta in Hungary, Konar Sandal in Iran, and is currently Director of the Penn Museum excavations at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. He has written a number of articles including "Genes, Language, and Culture: An Example from the Tarim Basin," Oxford Journal of Archaeology 23.1 (2004): 83–106 (with T.G. Schurr); "A New Look at the Prehistoric Metallurgy of Southeastern Iran," Iran XLII (2004): 47–59 (with C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky); "The Emergence of Complex Metallurgy on the Iranian Plateau: Escaping the Levantine Paradigm," Journal of World Prehistory 22(3), 2009: 301–27; and "The Development of Metallurgy in Eurasia," Antiquity 83(322), 2009: 1012–22 (with B.W. Roberts and V.C. Pigott).

Links:
www.cpthornton.info

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Elif Ünlü, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Boğaziçi Universitesi
Elected: 2008 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Elif has a B.A. in Economics and German from Agnes Scott College and a M.A. in Economics from the University of Pittsburgh. She received her M.A. in Archaeology from the Department of History in 2003 from Boğaziçi University. In 2009 she earned her Ph.D. in Archaeology from the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Program at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation was entitled "Technological and Stylistic Evaluation of the Early Bronze Age Pottery at Tarsus-Gözlükule: Pottery Production and Its Interaction with Economic, Social, and Cultural Spheres." Elif's research interests include the archaeology of Anatolian, Aegean, Iranian, and Mesopotamian prehistory, with theoretical studies in technology and society, trade in ancient economies, and landscape archaeology. At present, Elif is an Assistant Professor at Boğaziçi University in the Department of History. She has been teaching there since her graduation from Penn in 2009.

Elif has experience excavating at sites in Germany, Iran, and Turkey. Since 2001 she has been the Project Assistant for the Tarsus-Gözlükule Archaeological Project in Mersin, Turkey. Also, beginning in 2010 she has been the pottery specialist at the Tell Ta'yinat Archaeological Project in Antioch, Turkey.

Elif has published articles on her excavations and research into pottery production, technology, and style. Most recently she published "A Tale of Two Potting Traditions: Technological Assessment of the Light Clay and the Red Gritty Ware Types at Tarsus-Gözlükule (Cilicia-Turkey) at the Beginning of the Third Millennium B.C." in the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 362. She is a contributing scholar to the Digital Gordion website at http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/history/bronzeage. She has presented papers on her research at conferences in the United States and Turkey. Most recently she delivered the paper "Late Bronze-Early Iron Age Transitional Pottery from the Northeast Mediterranean Settlements" at NOSTOI: Indigenous Culture, Migration, and Integration in the Aegean Islands and Western Anatolia during the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age, held in Istanbul in the spring of 2011. Her paper is forthcoming in the conference publication. Also, in the fall of 2013, Elif delivered the lecture "Recent Excavations at Tarsus-Gozlüküle in Turkey: Bronze Age through Abbasid" at the Penn museum.

Links:
http://hist.boun.edu.tr/elif.unlu.php
http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/history/bronzeage

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Günder Varinlioglu, Ph.D.
Elected: 2004 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

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Matthew W. Waters, Ph.D.
Professor of Classics and Ancient History, Department of Foreign Languages, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire
Elected: 1991 (Ancient History Graduate Group)

Matt received his B.A. from the University of Notre Dame, and both his M.A. and Ph.D. (1997) from the University of Pennsylvania in Ancient History. He has taught at Penn and the University of Delaware, and he joined the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire faculty as Assistant Professor of Classics and Ancient History in 2001. He is currently Professor of Classics and Ancient History and teaches a variety of ancient history, language, and literature courses. Matt was the winner of the Greenfield Prize from the American Oriental Society in 2006 and has been awarded fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies as well as Harvard University's Loeb Classical Library Foundation. He is currently a fellow at the Center for Hellenic Studies and the Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Matt's research interests include Assyrian-Elamite relations and the Achaemenid Persian Empire in the mid-first millennium BCE. He also examines cross-cultural connections between the ancient Near East and the Classical Greek world. He has published a book based on his dissertation entitled A Survey of Neo-Elamite History (2000). He has co-edited If a Man Built a Joyful House: Assyriological Studies in Honor of Erle Verdun Leichty (2006). He has published numerous articles and book reviews on ancient Near Eastern and Greek history, among them "Parsumash, Anshan, and Cyrus," in J. Alvarez-Mon and M. Garrison, eds., Elam and Persia (2011), 'Cyrus and the Achaemenids' in Iran (2004) and 'A Letter from Ashurbanipal to the Elders of Elam' in Journal of Cuneiform Studies (2002).

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Wu Xin, Ph.D.
Noble Group Fellow, W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research
Elected: 2001 (Department of the History of Art)

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Stephan Zink, Ph.D.
Research Fellow, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
Elected: 2007 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Stephan received his M.A. in Classical Archaeology, History and Political Philosophy at the University of Vienna, Austria in 2003. His M.A. thesis was entitled "Hellenistic Archives: Architecture and Function." He spent two years as an exchange student at the Free University in Berlin and the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. After joining AAMW as a Fulbright-fellow, he continued his studies in Hellenistic and Roman urbanism and architecture, as well as social and economic history. His advisor is Prof. Lothar Haselberger. Stephan's fieldwork experience includes several excavations in Austria and southern Italy. He also worked for several seasons in Syria with international crews at Dura Europos and in Palmyra.

Stephan's dissertation research involves an architectural study of the sanctuary of Apollo on the Palatine hill in Rome. It includes an on-site documentation of all archaeological remains preserved on the site, from the earliest structures that precede the sanctuary to its Imperial and Late Antique phases. The applied method of documentation entails traditional hand drawings, but also the latest techniques of digital surveying and 3D modeling. The sanctuary of Apollo was built by Octavian and dedicated in 28 B.C., just a year before he became Emperor Augustus. This monument was dedicated at a key moment in Roman history, and it embodies the transition from Roman Republic to Roman Empire. Stephan has conducted fieldwork campaigns at the sanctuary of Apollo over several years, and he is the first to systematically examine and document all construction phases of the site.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/home/SASFrontiers/zink.html
http://www.ostina.org/content/view/5322/1448/
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/03/080314-rome-temple.html
http://www.idb.arch.ethz.ch/1-1-home.html

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University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Contact Information

Janice Barrabee
Program Coordinator
Louis J. Kolb Society of Fellows
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaelology and Anthropology
3260 South Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 898-4000
jbarrabee@kolbsociety.com

All sixty-three Kolb Society fellows were once junior fellows. Each fellow has completed the dissertation and achieved a Ph.D. or has finished the course of study engaged in while a junior fellow and graduated with a B.A. or M.A. Post graduation, the fellows are pursuing careers both within and outside of academia.

 

Matthew D. Adams, Ph.D
Senior Research Scholar, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU
Elected: 1981 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Matthew graduated from Penn with a dual Ph.D. in Egyptology and Anthropology in 2005. His dissertation was entitled "Community and Society in Egypt in the First Intermediate Period: An Archaeological Investigation of the Abydos Settlement Site." He is currently a Senior Research Scholar at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Also, he is Associate Director and Field Director of the Institute's field research program at Abydos. In 2013–2014 Matt is serving on the board of the American Research Center in Egypt.

Link:
http://www.nyu.edu/gsas/dept/fineart/academics/abydos/abydos.htm


Joanne Baron, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2011 (Department of Anthropology)

Joanne is a lecturer in the department of Anthropology. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. Joanne excavates in Guatemala, studying the ancient Maya of the Classic Period (A.D. 250–900). Her research investigates the strategies used by Maya communities to retain their local identity and autonomy in the face of inter-polity hierarchies. Her dissertation, entitled "Patrons of La Corona: Deities and Power in a Classic Maya Community," was supervised by the late Emeritus Fellow Robert Sharer and her dissertation chair was Senior Fellow Richard Leventhal. In addition, Joanne works with Simon Martin, an associate curator at the Penn museum. For her dissertation, Joanne spent five field seasons excavating with the La Corona Regional Archaeology Project, directed by Marcello Canuto and Tomas Barrientos. La Corona is located in Northwestern Guatemala and contains a series of small temples that belonged to the site's patron gods. Just as modern towns sometimes have patron saints, ancient Maya cities also had patron gods that were the focus of community cults. Joanne's dissertation focuses on the ways these gods were worshiped and their importance in the creation of community identity and autonomy. In 2010 she received a prestigious Wenner-Gren dissertation fieldwork grant. She was also honored as a 2011 SAS Dean's Scholar. She has presented her dissertation research in the form of several conference papers as well as forthcoming publications. In 2014 she will begin work at a new site in Northwestern Guatemala together with a Guatemalan colleague.

Links
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/

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Janice Barrabee, Ph.D.
Web and Program Coordinator, Kolb Foundation
Consulting Scholar, Penn Museum
Elected: 1994 (Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies)

Janice received an A.B. in Anthropology and graduated summa cum laude from Princeton in 1987. She earned an M.A. from Bryn Mawr College in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology in 1991, and her Ph.D. in Assyriology from Penn in 2002. She also spent a year at the Institut für Assyriologie und Hethitologie, Ludwig Maximilian Universität in Munich, Germany. Upon graduation she took a position as a Research Associate and subsequently Editor for the Institute for Aegean Prehistory (INSTAP). She has recently been a Visiting Scholar in the Department of the History of Art at Penn. She is currently the Web and Program Coordinator for the Kolb Foundation and a Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum.

Janice's research focuses on the Sumerian and Akkadian language texts and the art of ancient Mesopotamia, with a special interest in literary texts, and textual and artistic representations of religion and ritual. Her dissertation entitled "The Rise of the Sun God and the Determination of Destiny in Ancient Mesopotamia," investigated the ideological and ceremonial response to the rising sun evidenced in Ur III and Old Babylonian period Sumerian and Akkadian compositions. She has presented papers and published articles in connection with her dissertation research, and has a recent article (2011) entitled "The King of Justice: A Reconsideration of the River Ordeal in BM 45690," which interprets a vivid account of the performance of the river ordeal in Mesopotamia. She is collaborating on the Buffalo Seal Project with Senior Fellow Holly Pittman. In addition, she is conducting research on Akkadian period seals with sunrise imagery in the Penn Museum collection, and will present a paper on that topic at the upcoming AIA annual meeting in January 2012. Janice also works with local elementary and middle schools in order to promote an understanding of archaeology and ancient civilizations in the early stages of learning.

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Ellen E. Bell, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Geography, and Ethnic Studies, California State University, Stanislaus
Elected: 1999 (Department of Anthropology)

Ellen earned a B.A. in Anthropology from Kenyon College in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007. Her area of specialty is Mesoamerican Archaeology. Her dissertation, entitled "Early Classic Ritual Deposits within the Copan Acropolis: The Material Foundations of Political Power at a Classic Period Maya Center," focused on ritual deposits at the site of Copan, located in western Honduras. These include the Hunal and Margarita tombs, thought to have held the remains of the first king of the Classic period Copan dynasty, K'inich Yax K'uk' Mo', who reigned from 426–437, as well an important woman, most likely his queen. Her research interests include: Mesoamerican archaeology, material culture studies, political organization, archaeology of gender, Maya epigraphy and iconography, household archaeology, anthropology of religion and ritual, and the history of Mesoamerican archaeology.

Ellen has been a faculty member at C.S.U., Stanislaus since 2007. She is presently an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Institute for Archaeological Research. She also advises the Anthropology Club. In 2010–2011 she was a Dumbarton Oaks Fellow in Pre-Columbian Studies, investigating the topic of "Objects of Power on the Edge of the Maya World: Early Copan Acropolis Tombs, Offerings, and Special Deposits."

Ellen is co-director of the El Paraíso Region Archaeological Project (PAREP), which investigates administrative strategies in the Classic Maya Kingdom of Copan, Honduras. She includes undergraduate and graduate students in her research projects, and works to conduct all investigations within a framework of community responsive archaeology. She is also involved in the Kenyon Honduras Digitization Project (KHDP), which is building a digital archive of over 30 years of household archaeology in western Honduras that will be accessible on-line. In the spring of 2011 she chaired and presented "Who's at the Top in a 'Top-Down' Approach?: Social Differentiation and Administrative Strategies in the El Paraíso Valley, Department of Copan, Honduras" in a poster session at the Society for American Archaeology 76th Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA. Her publications include Understanding Early Classic Copan, published by the University of Pennsylvania Museum, several book chapters, and articles in English and Spanish journals, including Ancient Mesoamerica, The Journal of Archaeological Science, Mexicon, Expedition, and Yaxkin.

Links:
http://www.csustan.edu/anthro/Faculty/EllenBell.html
http://parep.research.yale.edu/

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Seth Bernard, Ph.D.
Faculty, Classics Department, Swarthmore College
Elected: 2008 (Ancient History Graduate Group)

Seth earned his B.A. in Classics at Amherst College in 2003. Prior to joining the Ancient History program he worked with the Greek and Roman collection at the Metropolitan Museum and the Yale Art Gallery. He also spent a year studying as a Fulbright Fellow as a Regular Member at the American School at Athens. He has excavated at Ancient Corinth and worked on a survey in eastern Morocco. He is currently involved in bringing to publication the excavation of an imperial villa in the Valle del Sacco in Lazio, south of the town of Anagni in Italy (the Villa Magna Project co-sponsored by the Penn museum). His work on the masonry styles and Roman brick stamps helped to secure a Hadrianic date for the villa's earliest phases. In 2010 he was named a Dean's Scholar, an award open to the entire graduate student community. He also received a Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching by Graduate Students. This fall Seth joined the Classics Department at Swarthmore College.

Seth's main interests lie in ancient urbanism and the Roman economy. This winter, he will defend his dissertation on public construction and society in Rome during the middle Republican period, c. 400–150 B.C.E, when the city of Rome took on a great deal of economic and urban complexity for the very first time. His work involves a close study of the material and documentary record for all building projects in the city during this time span. Situating changes in technology and urban layout in technology within their historical context allows an understanding of how the creation of an urban fabric impacts a city's residents. Given the great effort necessary for monumental architecture in the pre-industrial world, the construction industry at Rome and elsewhere can be viewed as a prime force behind changes in a city's economy and society.

Seth just returned from a year as pre-doctoral Rome Prize fellow at the American Academy in Rome, where he has completed the fieldwork for his dissertation. He has recently published an article entitled "Pentelic Marble in Roman Architecture and the Republican Marble Trade" in the Journal of Roman Archaeology. This article presents the results of isotopic analysis of two early marble temples at Rome as well as Seth's economic model for the system by which Rome first extracted, transported, and built with Greek marble in the late second century B.C.E. He has also published in the Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik, and has contributed to the forthcoming Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History.

Links:
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/
http://www.aarome.org/
http://www.villa-magna.org/

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Alexis Boutin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Sonoma State University, California
Elected: 2005 (Department of Anthropology)

Alexis graduated from Pomona College in Claremont, CA with honors in 2000, majoring in History, with a minor in Classics; she earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2008. Her dissertation was entitled "Embodying Life and Death: Osteobiographical Narratives from Alalakh." Alexis is currently an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Sonoma State University in California. The bioarchaeological fieldwork and museum collections research she conducts focuses on ancient Near Eastern, Arabian Gulf, and eastern Mediterranean societies. She has participated in excavations, survey, and collections research at Alalakh, Turkey; Troodos Archaeological and Environmental Survey Project on the island of Cyprus; Tel el-Far'ah South, Israel; on the island of Crete; and in the United Kingdom. She has also worked on osteological collections at the British Museum and, most recently, the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology. She is the co-director (with Fellow Benjamin Porter) of the Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project, which is based at the Hearst Museum.

Alexis' publications use human skeletal remains, archaeological contexts, and ancient texts to explore embodied personhood in all of its iterations. Much of her teaching is oriented around human skeletal biology and its analysis by means of forensic methods. In addition to the lower division G.E. course "Introduction to Biological Anthropology," her upper division offerings include "Human Osteology," Bioarchaeology," "Organization of Societies," and "Forensic Anthropology." Alexis is working on several co-authored and co-edited volumes and has a forthcoming book co-edited with Fellow Aubrey Baadsgaard and Jane E. Buikstra, Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death: Contemporary Approaches to Bioarchaeology.

Link:
https://www.sonoma.edu/users/b/boutin/

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Cortney Chaffin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of East Asian Art History, Department of Art and Design, College of Fine Arts & Communication (COFAC), University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point
Elected: 2002 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations)

Cortney received her B.A. from the University of Michigan-Dearborn. She earned her M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her doctorate in 2007 at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (EALC), with a specialization in Chinese Art and Archaeology. Her dissertation, entitled "Strange Creatures of Chu: Antlered Tomb Sculptures of the Spring and Autumn and Warring States Periods," examined wooden sculptures painted with lacquer and adorned with real deer antlers in order to determine the significance of these burial images. Cortney studied abroad in China, and she is fluent in Mandarin.

Cortney taught at the University of Michigan-Dearborn in the Art History Department before coming to University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 2007, where she teaches the non-western art history classes, specializing in the arts of China, Eurasia, Japan, and India. She is also active in the Center for East Asian Studies. In 2009, she organized a month-long event sponsored by the College of Fine Arts & Communication, "COFAC creates: Japan—the Floating World." This included an exhibition of 18th–19th century Japanese woodblock prints from the Utagawa school loaned by the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, as well as lectures and performances. She followed this in early spring of 2012 with "COFAC Creates: Xu Bing-The Art of Rewriting China," a program of events featuring the work of contemporary Chinese artist Xu Bing. The event also included a series of lectures, workshops, films, and performances on contemporary Chinese art.  She also led a study tour to China with Professor Larry Ball in 2010, entitled Life and Death in Early and Imperial China. Cortney has lectured on topics stemming from her dissertation, including a recent presentation at Masterworks of Ancient Chinese Art: A Conference at the Portland Art Museum.

Link:
http://www.uwsp.edu/art-design/Pages/Faculty/CortneyChaffin.aspx

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Bien Chiang, Ph.D.
Section Director, Institute of Ethnology Academica Sinica, Taiwan
Associate Professor at the Institute of Anthropology at National Tsing Hua University
Elected: 1987 (Department of Anthropology)

Bien Chiang was one of the first junior fellows supported by the Kolb Foundation. He graduated from Penn with a Ph.D. in Anthropology in 1993. His dissertation, "House and Social Hierarchy of the Paiwan," was an ethnographic study of an Austronesian group of approximately 55,000 people inhabiting the southern part of the island of Taiwan. Soon after graduation he returned to Taiwan, where he is an Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology Academica Sinica and an Associate Professor at the Institute of Anthropology at National Tsing Hua University. Also, he is a Research Fellow at the Center for Asia-Pacific Areas Studies (CAPAS), established in 2003. His research is published primarily in Chinese.

Links: http://www.ioe.sinica.edu.tw/Content/Researcher/content.aspx?&SiteID=530367205133077215&MenuID=530400021400001437&Fid=0&MSID=530210537660572643
http://www2.hss.nthu.edu.tw/en/model1.php?id=3500

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Miriam Clinton, Ph.D.
Critical Writing Fellow, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2008 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Miriam received her B.A. summa cum laude with Distinction in both Archaeological Studies and Classical Civilizations at Yale University in 2005. As an undergraduate, she had field experience in the United States and in Italy, and was trained in conservation techniques and the historiography of Minoan civilizations at Palaikastro, Crete. She joined AAMW with a strong interest in the Aegean Bronze Age, especially Minoan Crete. In 2009–2010, she completed a Fulbright year in Greece. Miriam received her Ph.D. in 2013. Her dissertation, under her advisors, Prof. Philip Betancourt and Prof. Thomas Tartaron, is titled "Access and Circulation Pattern Analysis in Neopalatial Architecture on Crete:  A Methodology for Identifying Private Spaces." Her topic focuses on access and circulation patterns of Minoan houses, with the goals of determining 1) how these are associated with existing formal typologies of Minoan houses; 2) whether they relate to socio-economic status; and 3) how they can allow us to determine the distinction between public and private architecture.

Miriam participates in the Saronic Harbors Archaeological Research Project (SHARP) in Korfos, Greece, directed by Thomas F. Tartaron of Penn and Daniel J. Pullen of Florida State University. She also conducts fieldwork with the Institute for Aegean Prehistory Study Center for East Crete and has worked at Plakias, Mochlos, Karoumes, and Papadiokampos, a Proto- and Neo-palatial town near Siteia.

She presented a paper at the AIA Annual Meetings in January 2011 entitled "New Evidence for Minoan Staircases," which arose directly from her dissertation research, and has presented several others on a variety of topics, including "Transitional Spaces in Pre- and Proto-Palatial Minoan Tomb Architecture" in 2013. She has also published an article entitled "Rapid Cooling Effects in Early Bronze Age Copper Smelting Slags from Chrysokamino," with co-authors Shannon Martino, George H. Myer, Dennis O. Terry, Jr., and Philip P. Betancourt in Aegean Archaeology 8 (2009): 21–30. She is currently completing four chapters for the SHARP monograph and collaborating with a ceramic specialist on Crete to find the most likely clay sources to be used in association with known Minoan sites, especially Papadiokampos and Mochlos. They will attempt to find the routes used to travel between those clay sources and the workshops where pottery was produced.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/
http://upenn.academia.edu/MiriamClinton

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Deborah M. Deliyannis, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of History, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana     
Elected: 1990 (Department of the History of Art)

Deborah graduated from Yale University in 1988, with a degree in Archaeological Studies. The same year, she entered the graduate program in the Department of the History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania, and was named a Kolb junior fellow in 1991. She completed her Ph.D. in 1994, under the direction of Cecil L. Striker (History of Art) and James J. O'Donnell (Classics), with a dissertation entitled "The Liber Pontificalis Ecclesiae Ravennatis:  Critical Edition and Commentary." She has taught at Western Michigan University, and is currently Associate Professor in the Department of History at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Deborah specializes in the history and material culture of early medieval Europe (c. 400–900 A.D.); in her research, she combines her background in archaeology and architectural history with the study of the way history was written in the Early Middle Ages. She has published a Latin edition (Brepols, 2006) and an English translation (Catholic University of America Press, 2004) of the ninth-century author Agnellus' Liber pontificalis ecclesiae Ravennatis (Book of Pontiffs of the Church of Ravenna). Each of these volumes includes a study of the text, in which she explores Agnellus' literary models and sources, and explains why the text has its rather idiosyncratic form and chronological structure. Her most recent book, Ravenna in Late Antiquity (Cambridge University Press, 2010), is a history of the city and monuments of Ravenna from the fifth to the ninth centuries. Her current project, tentatively entitled Bishops and Buildings in the Early Middle Ages, considers the role of bishops as church-builders from late antiquity through the Carolingian period. In addition to these research projects, she has edited a book entitled Historiography in the Middle Ages (Brill, 2003), and co-edited, with Judson Emerick, Archaeology in Architecture: Studies in Honor of Cecil L. Striker (von Zabern, 2005).  Finally, she is the Executive Editor of The Medieval Review, an online book review journal in medieval studies.

Links:
http://www.indiana.edu/~histweb/faculty/Display.php?Faculty_ID=53
https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3631

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Paul Delnero, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Assyriology, Johns Hopkins University
Elected: 1997 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Paul graduated from Purdue University in 1995 and received his Ph.D. from Penn in 2006. The title of his dissertation was "Variation in Sumerian Literary Compositions: A Case Study Based on the Decad." He is an Assistant Professor of Assyriology
 at Johns Hopkins University.

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Kristen Fellows, Ph.D.
Elected: 2010 (Department of Anthropology)

Kristen received her B.A. from the University of Florida in Anthropology. She graduated with a Ph.D. from Penn's Anthropology department in 2013. She has participated in fieldwork at Monticello, Virginia; Paynes Town Seminole Site, Florida; Vineland, New Jersey; Pahala Plantation, Hawaii; Rose Hill, New York; Samaná, Dominican Republic; Portsmouth, Dominica; and Mandeville, Jamaica. Kristen's subfield of choice is historical archaeology. Her research interests include Caribbean studies, with a particular focus on the Dominican Republic; feminist and gender archaeologies; plantation systems; enslaved communities; race and racisms; early globalization; and social stratification.

Kristen's dissertation, with the title "African Americans from 'Back Yonder': The Historical Archaeology of the Formation, Maintenance, and Dissolution of the American Enclave in Samana, Dominican Republic," focuses on a free black community who emigrated from the United States to Haiti in the 1820s and their descendants who have remained in what is now Samaná, Dominican Republic. This community serves as a lens through which she explores the processes of community formation and maintenance and the intersection of race and nation. In 2010 she conducted fieldwork in the Dominican Republic; the primary focus was an aboveground study of the cemetery in the town of Santa Barbará de Samaná, involving surveying, mapping, and aerial photography. She also completed a series of oral history interviews with local members of the descendant community and archival research locally and at the Sociolinguistic Laboratory at the University of Ottawa. She has presented a poster and a series of papers on her findings at the annual meetings for the Society for Historical Archaeology including a poster in January 2011, the paper "Boundary Making in the African Diaspora: 'Inmigrantes Norteamericanos' in Samaná, Dominican Republic" (2012) in a session she co-chaired, and the paper "African Americans in a Dominican Cemetery: Social Boundaries of an Enclave Community" (2013). In January, 2014, she will present the paper "Negotiating Transnational Identity in Post-Revolutionary Hispaniola" in Quebec City.

During the summers of 2012 and 2013, Kristen served as the Field Director at Marshall's Pen, a colonial coffee plantation outside of Mandeville, Jamaica. With James Delle (Kutztown University), the P.I. on the project, she has multiple articles forthcoming concerned with this site, as well as a wheat plantation site in Upstate New York. These publications include: "The Racialization of Labor in Early 19th-century Upstate New York: Archaeology at the Rose Hill Quarter Site, Geneva," in Race in the Northeast: Archaeological Studies of Racialization, Resistance, and Memory; "Death and Burial at Marshall's Pen, a Jamaican Coffee Plantation, 1814–1839: Examining the End of Life at the End of Slaver," Slavery and Abolition; and "A Plantation Transplanted: Archaeological Investigations of a Piedmont-Style Slave Quarter at Rose Hill," Northeast Historical Archaeology.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/

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Michael D. Frachetti, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 
Elected: 2000 (Department of Anthropology)

Michael graduated with honors from SUNY at Buffalo in 1997 with a degree in Anthropology. He received a M. Phil with distinction in Archaeology from St. John's College, Cambridge University, in 1999. He wrote his dissertation entitled, "Bronze Age Pastoral Landscapes of Eurasia and the Nature of Social Interaction in the Mountain Steppe Zone of Eastern Kazakhstan," and garnered his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2004. He was a Visiting Post-doctoral Scholar in the Eurasian Department at the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut in Berlin (2004–2005), and then joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and is the Director of the SAIE Lab. He is also a Research Associate at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology (UCLA). In 2012 Michael began a three-year term on the Kolb executive committee as a director of the Kolb Foundation. He is also a Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU for the 2012–2013 academic year.

Michael's research centers on the Bronze Age (ca. 3500–1000 B.C.E.), pastoral nomadic societies living in the steppe region, mountains, and deserts of central and eastern Eurasia, focusing on questions of social and economic interaction between regional populations across central Asia at that time. He has written numerous articles, including "Differentiated Landscapes and Non-Uniform Complexity among Bronze Age Societies of the Eurasian Steppe," in B. Hanks and K. Linduff, eds., Social Complexity in Prehistoric Eurasia: Monuments, Metals and Mobility, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009: 19–46 and "Variability and Dynamic Landscapes of Mobile Pastoralism in Ethnography and Prehistory," in H. Barnard and W. Wendrich, eds., The Archaeology of Mobility: Nomads in the Old and in the New World, Cotsen Advanced Seminar Series 4, 2008: 366–96. He has also published the monograph Pastoralist Landscapes and Social Interaction in Bronze Age Eurasia, Berkley: University of California Press (2008). Michael lectures throughout the United States and internationally, and recently participated in the Penn Museum Symposium in March 2011 accompanying the Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition, with a talk entitled "Seeds for the Soul: East/West Diffusion of Domesticated Grains along the Inner Asian Mountain Corridor."

Michael currently conducts field research in eastern Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. He is the director of the Dzhungar Mountains Archaeology Project (DMAP) in Kazakhstan, which began in 1999, and more recently, a project referred to as Malguzar Uzbek/American Archaeological Research (MALGUZAAR) in Uzbekistan. From 2010 to 2011 he directed the Zaamin Archaeological Pilot Project (ZAPP), which consisted of two field-seasons of archaeological survey and test excavations in the Zaamin territory of eastern Uzbekistan. He is also the director of the Nias Island Assessment of Social impact on Ecology (NIASE) Project, examining the ecological impact of the degradation of the coastline and the response to intensive environmental change on the island of Nias (Indonesia) after the tsunami in 2004 and the earthquake in 2005.

Links:
www.saie.wustl.edu
http://www.saie.wustl.edu/index.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7qq9__GWN0&feature=BFp&list=PL286E934A56954D08&index=4

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William Bradley Hafford, Ph.D.
Project Manager, Ur Digitization Project, Penn Museum
Elected: 1995 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate group)

Brad earned a B.A. in Anthropology and a B.A. in Classical Studies at the University of Washington in Seattle, receiving magna cum laude honors for both degrees. He was also phi beta kappa. In addition, he has an Associates Degree in Communications Technology from Community College of the Air Force. His Ph.D. was received from the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group at the University of Pennsylvania in 2001, and his dissertation was entitled "Merchants in the Late Bronze Age Eastern Mediterranean: Tools, Texts and Trade." Brad has been a Lecturer in the Critical Writing Program of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at Penn. He has also served as a Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum. Brad has recently been named the Project Manager of the Ur Digitization Project at the museum.

Brad's area of specialization is in the Eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age. His research focuses on ancient economics, trade routes, and particularly physical assemblages of merchants, as well as the origins of currency. Other archaeological interests include field methods, site mapping, computer applications, and underwater archaeology. He has excavated in the United States at the sites of San Juan Islands, Washington, and Castle Rock Pueblo and Sand Canyon Pueblo, Colorado; participated in the Scottish Coastal Survey in Britain; and excavated at Pseira and Chrysokamino on Crete. He has served as an area supervisor of the Tell es-Sweyhat Archaeological Project since 1998 and was an Associate Director of the excavations from 2008 to 2010. He is the Assistant Director of the Howard University Giza Cemetery Project.

Brad has written both fiction and non-fiction, including pieces about archaeology and ancient civilizations for educational children's magazines Calliope and Dig. His scholarly contributions include a co-authored article "The City of Sweyhat: A Mesopotamian Mystery," in Current World Archaeology (2008), and "Hanging in the Balance: Precision Weighing in Antiquity," in Expedition (2005) and "Mesopotamian Mensuration: Balance Pan Weights from Nippur," in Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient (2005). In 2012 he published "Weighing in Mesopotamia: The Balance Pan Weights from Ur," Akkadica 133: 21–65. He is currently working on publishing all of the Nippur weight data from his 2005 article with Open Context so that it is easily available for further research.

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Ömür Harmanşah, Ph.D
Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University
Elected: 1999 (Department of the History of Art)


Ömür Harmanşah has been an Assistant Professor of Archaeology and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies at Brown University's Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World since 2007. He works and teaches on the archaeology of the ancient Near East, particularly Mesopotamia, Anatolia and Syria. Born and raised in Turkey, Ömür studied architecture and architectural history at the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. He received his Ph.D. in the History of Art from University of Pennsylvania in 2005. Prior to coming to Brown, he also taught at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. He recently was a Senior Fellow at Koç University's Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations in Istanbul, Turkey.

Ömür's academic interests are increasingly focused on issues of landscape, place, performance, and memory. He is particularly influenced by the developing fields of material culture studies; ethnographies of space, place and landscape; and anthropological theories of art, technology and agency. He is currently working on a monograph entitled "Imagined Cities: Architecture, Space and Commemoration in the Ancient Near East." He is directing the Brown University based Yalburt Yaylası Archaeological Landscape Research Project, a regional survey in the Konya Province of West-Central Turkey.

Links:
http://proteus.brown.edu/harmansah/Home
http://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Omur_Harmansah
http://rcac.ku.edu.tr/
http://proteus.brown.edu/eventplace/Home
http://brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/

 

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Salah Hassan, Ph.D.
Goldwin Smith Professor of African and African Diaspora Art History and Visual Culture, Department of History of Art and Visual Culture, Cornell University
Director of the Institute for Comparative Modernities (ICM),
Elected: 1986 (Department of Folklore and Folklife)

Salah received a B.A. with honors in 1978 from the University of Khartoum. He earned an M.A. in 1984 from the University of Pennsylvania, and graduated with a Ph.D. in 1988. His dissertation, which he wrote in the Department of Folklore and Folklife, was entitled "Lore of the Traditional Malam: Material Culture of Literacy and Ethnography of Writing among the Hausa of Northern Nigeria." Presently, he is Director of the Institute for Comparative Modernities (ICM) and Goldwin Smith Professor in the Department of History of Art and Visual Culture at Cornell University. Salah served as Chair of the department between 2000 and 2005. Throughout his career he has taught graduate and undergraduate courses on African and African American art history, African aesthetics, African cinema, Blacks in film, and contemporary art and theory, while simultaneously mentoring and successfully supervising numerous master and doctoral theses.

Links:
http://africana.cornell.edu/people/hassan.cfm
http://arthistory.cornell.edu/people/hassan.cfm
http://icm.arts.cornell.edu/icm_members.html

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Susan Helft, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of History, Rutgers, Newark, New Jerey
Elected: 2005 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Susan earned a B.A. in Ancient Studies at Barnard College in 2000. She received her Ph.D. from Penn in 2011. Her dissertation was entitled "Patterns of Exchange/Patterns of Power: A New Archaeology of the Hittite Empire." Susan's main area of interest is Near Eastern archaeology with a focus on Bronze Age Anatolia. She has participated in several excavations in the Ukraine, in Israel , and in Turkey, working at Tell Atchana/Alalakh. Susan is a Lecturer in the Department of History at Rutgers University in Newark.

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Jane Hickman, Ph.D.
Editor of Expedition
Consulting Scholar and Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs, Penn Museum
Elected: 2006 (Department of Anthropology)

Jane Hickman received her M.A. in 2000 and her Ph.D. in 2008 in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to that, she received an M.L.A. and an M.A.S. from Johns Hopkins University, as well as a B.S. from Towson University in Baltimore, MD.
As a graduate student at Penn, during the 2004–05 academic year, she was a Fulbright scholar at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Jane's research focuses on gold and silver jewelry from the ancient Aegean, the Near East, and Central Asia. Her dissertation was entitled "Gold Before the Palaces: Crafting Jewelry and Social Identity in Minoan Crete." Her main area of interest is the Aegean, and she has excavated at Corinth, as well as Hagios Charalambos and Chrysokamino on Crete.

Jane is currently the Editor of Expedition magazine. She also serves as a Consulting Scholar and Special Assistant to the Director for Museum Programs. In that capacity, she organizes academic programs such as panel discussions and conferences. She recently (spring 2011) organized the Secrets of the Silk Road Symposium: "Reconfiguring the Silk Road: New Research on East-West Exchange in Antiquity," accompanying the exhibition at the Penn Museum. She is co-editing a volume with Victor Mair stemming from the symposium. She has delivered papers and published articles on jewelry from various sites. In March 2011 she presented "A Closer Look at Gold Jewellery from Tillya Tepe," in the conference at the British Museum "Afghanistan: Crossroads of the Ancient World." She recently published "The Dog Diadem from Mochlos," in a volume for Emeritus Fellow James Muhly, Metallurgy: Understanding How, Learning Why. Studies in Honor of James D. Muhly.

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Jane Hill, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Rowan University
Elected: 2008 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Jane Hill received her B.A. in Journalism at the University of Mississippi where she graduated summa cum laude in 1987. After working as a beat reporter and investigative writer for several newspapers in the southeastern United States, Jane returned to graduate school at the University of Memphis where she earned her M.A. in Anthropology in 1999 studying Pre-Columbian Mississippian cultures. She also earned another M.A. in Art History and Egyptology from the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology at the University of Memphis in 2001. Her thesis, Cylinder Seal Glyptic in Predynastic Egypt and Neighboring Regions, was recognized as the outstanding thesis in Art History in 2002, and was published in 2004. While in Memphis she worked with Dr. William J. Murnane on his epigraphic survey of the Hypostyle Hall in Karnak Temple in Luxor, Egypt.

In 2000, Jane was accepted into the Penn's Egyptology program. Her research interests include the development of writing in ancient Egypt's Predynastic and Early Dynastic periods and how it was used as an administrative and symbolic tool. During her tenure at Penn, Jane worked with numerous archaeological projects in Giza's western cemeteries, the New Kingdom temple complex of the pharaoh Ahmose at Abydos, the Middle Kingdom cemetery at Saqqara, the Middle Kingdom town of Wah-Sut dedicated to the cult of the pharaoh Senwosret III. Her own dissertation research was conducted at the Predynastic cemetery site of el-Amra, Upper Egypt, and was supported by a National Science Foundation Dissertation Enhancement Grant. Her survey uncovered a previously unknown settlement containing evidence of sealing practices, specialized production, and contact with the cultures of the southern Levant. Josef Wegner was her principle dissertation advisor and Kolb Senior Fellows David P. Silverman and Richard Zettler served on her advisory committee. Jane was awarded her doctorate in the spring of 2010. Her dissertation is entitled "Interregional Trade, Cultural Exchange and Specialized Production in the Late Predynastic: Archeological Analysis of el-Amra, Upper Egypt."

Currently, Jane is conducting a multi-year research project involving the large Predynastic Egyptian collection at the Penn Museum. She plans to return to el-Amra to conduct excavations of the settlement in 2012/13. Jane currently is adjunct faculty to the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Rowan University where she is conducting an interdisciplinary research project involving Predynastic human remains in the Penn Museum collection.

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John Holloran, Ph.D
History Department Chair, Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, Oregon
Elected: 1988 (Department of German Language and Literature, B.A.)

John was an undergraduate Kolb junior fellow. He earned his B.A. from Penn in 1990 in German Language and Literature, graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He went on to receive an M.A. in European History from the University of Virginia in 1994 and subsequently a Ph.D. in 2000 in Early Modern European Intellectual History. John is chair of the history department at Oregon Episcopal School in Portland, Oregon.

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Radu Ioviţă, Ph.D.
Research Scientist at the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz (RGZM)
Elected: 2007 (Department of Anthropology)

Radu received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2008, under the supervision of Senior Fellow Harold Dibble. His dissertation entitled "Ontogenetic Scaling in Stone Tools and its Application to European Middle Paleolithic Systematics," quantified and compared reduction trajectories in resharpened tools of the European Middle Paleolithic, with a specific focus on scrapers and bifaces from France, Germany, and the Ukraine. He completed his M.Phil. in archaeology at Cambridge with distinction in 2002, under the supervision of Paul Mellars. His research tested the hypothesis of migration from North Africa to the Levant, studying the technologies of the Dabban from Haua Fteah and the Emiran from Ksar Akil. The latter were studied as part of his undergraduate thesis under the supervision of Ofer Bar-Yosef at Harvard. Radu received an A.B. in Anthropology, graduating magna cum laude in 2001.

Radu is currently a research fellow at the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz (RGZM), coordinating two major projects: The Neandertal Projectile Technology Project (NeProTec), and the Lower Danube Survey Project (LoDanS). The first of these, funded by the German Research Foundation (RGZM overseen by P.I. Prof. Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser), and carried out in collaboration with the German Metrology Institute (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt; P.I. Dr. Frank Jäger), aims to elucidate macro- and microscopic breakage patterns on projectile points using controlled ballistic experiments where point shape, trajectory, and targets are held constant. At the same time, Radu is working in the field in Romania, carrying out an international collaborative survey project funded by the Max-Planck-Society. The aim of the survey is to test hypotheses about colonization routes into and out of Europe through a geomorphologically and paleoenvironmentally-informed archaeological survey. Radu is also interested in quantifying shape in lithic tools, especially with the aid of modern morphometric methods. He has published several papers on using Elliptical Fourier Analysis, including "Quantifying and Comparing Stone Tool Resharpening Trajectories with the Aid of Elliptical Fourier Analysis," in S. Lycett and P. Chauhan (eds.), New Perspectives on Old Stones: Analytical Approaches to Palaeolithic Technologies (Dordrect, The Netherlands: Springer/Kluwer, 2010), 235–53 and "Ontogenetic scaling and lithic systematics: method and application," Journal of Archaeological Science 36(7): 1447–57. He is currently applying Elliptical Fourier Analysis to assess variability in Aterian projectile points.

In addition to his research, Radu teaches prehistory at the University of Mainz. His last two courses were a practicum and seminar in lithic analysis and an introductory course in statistics for archaeologists. He is currently working on developing a course on anthropological approaches to archaeology and one on cognitive approaches.

Links:
http://sites.google.com/site/raduiovita/
http://rgzm.academia.edu/RaduIovita/
http://web.rgzm.de/856.html?L=1
http://lodans.wordpress.com
http://web.rgzm.de/fileadmin/gruppen/rgzm/2010/Iovita_in_Lycett2010.pdfhttp://web.rgzm.de/fileadmin/gruppen/rgzm/2009/Iovita_Article_Ontogenetic_Scaling.pdf

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Joshua Jeffers, Ph.D.
Elected: 2010 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Joshua graduated from Johnson University with a B.A. in Biblical Studies in 1999 and received a M.Div. from Emmanuel School of Religion in 2002 and a Th.M. from Princeton Theological Seminary in 2003. He studied Assyriology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Penn, successfully defending his dissertation, which was entitled "Tiglath-pileser I: A Light in a 'Dark Age'," in May 2013. In 2010 he received an American Academie Research Institute in Iraq award for his dissertation.

Joshua's dissertation research deals with textual material that has recently become available relating to Tiglath-Pileser I. He examined economic and historical cuneiform tablets that belong to Tiglath-pileser I and his immediate predecessors and successors. These allow him to consider the king's role as a transitioning figure from the Middle Assyrian territorial state of the second millennium to the Neo-Assyrian empire of the first. To this aim, he has conducted research at the Vorderasiatisches Museum in Berlin, which houses most of the primary documents from the Middle Assyrian period that were obtained by the German excavations of the city of Aššur in the early 1900s.

Joshua has presented several talks at Penn and the University of Delaware. He delivered a paper at the Barcelona meeting of the RAI in 2010 concerning the reliefs of Sennacherib. This research appears in the article, "Fifth Campaign Reliefs in Sennacherib's 'Palace Without Rival' at Nineveh," Iraq 73 (2011): 87–116. He also presented a paper, "The Assyrian Adoption of the Babylonian Luni-solar Calendrical System," at the 223rd American Oriental Society Meeting in Portland, Oregon, in March 2013.

Links:

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/

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Tarek Kahlaoui, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Islamic Art in Dept of Art History, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey
Elected: 2002 (Department of the History of Art)

Tarek is currently an Assistant Professor of Islamic Art in the Department of Art History at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He graduated from Penn with a Ph.D. from the Department of the History of Art in 2008. His dissertation was entitled "The Depiction of the Mediterranean in Islamic Cartography (11th–16th centuries): The suras (Images) of the Mediterranean from the Bureaucrats to the Sea Captains."

Link:
http://arthistory.rutgers.edu/index.php

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Sarah Kurnick, Ph.D.
Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2011 (Department of Anthropology)

Sarah earned a B.A. in Anthropology from Haverford College in 2006 and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. She specializes in Mesoamerican archaeology and focuses on the creation and perpetuation of institutionalized social inequality. Her dissertation, "Negotiating the Contradictions of Political Authority: An Archaeological Case Study from Callar Creek, Belize," examines the strategies rulers use to acquire and maintain political authority and the reasons their followers choose to obey. To fund her dissertation research, Sarah received grants from the National Science Foundation and the American Philosophical Society.

Sarah is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, and in the spring will be an Assistant Adjunct Professor at Lehigh University. She is also starting a new archaeological project in Yucatan, Mexico, which will examine the role of the past in the operation of politically authoritative relationships among the Postclassic Maya. She has presented her research at numerous conferences and symposia, including the Belize Archaeology Symposium, the Yucatan in Pennsylvania Roundtable, and the Penn Maya Weekend. Her publications include "The Importance of the Past to the Ancient Maya Political Present: Recent Investigations at Callar Creek, Belize," published in Research Reports in Belizean Archaeology, and "Crossing Boundaries: Maya Censers from the Guatemala Highlands," published in Expedition. An edited volume manuscript, which Sarah contributed to and co-edited with Fellow Joanne Baron, is currently under review by the University Press of Colorado.

Links:
http://repository.upenn.edu/dissertations/AAI3566312/
http://www.penn.museum/documents/publications/expedition/PDFs/51-1/Kurnick.pdf
http://penn.museum/documents/publications/expedition/PDFs/54-1/book-news.pdf

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Dawn Landua-McCormack, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of History, Middle Tennessee State University
Elected: 1998 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Dawn received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997. She graduated summa cum laude with distinction in Anthropology. She continued her education at Penn, earning her Ph.D. in 2008 from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Her major concentration was Egyptology with a minor in the Archaeology of Mesopotamia, and her dissertation was entitled "Dynasty XIII Kingship in Ancient Egypt: A Study of Political Power and Administration through an Investigation of the Royal Tombs of the Late Middle Kingdom." Her study examined the more than fifty kings who reigned in a period of approximately 150 years during Dynasty XIII, reviewing the chronological sequence of these kings and their means of legitimization and succession as well as the royal funerary monuments, which provide information regarding kingship at this time. Upon graduation from Penn, Dawn took a position at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where she is an Assistant Professor in the History Department.

Dawn has participated in several excavations in Egypt, beginning as a graduate student at Penn. She has been associated with projects in Abydos since 1996, and she is currently the Director of the Middle Tennessee State University South Abydos Mastabas Project, under the aegis of the University of Pennsylvania-Yale-Institute of Fine Arts Expedition to Abydos. This ongoing project, which includes both graduate and undergraduate students from MTSU, involves the excavation of a Dynasty XIII royal tomb. Dawn served as Historical Period Director for the Abydos Survey for Paleolithic Sites, University of Pennsylvania Museum Project at Abydos, which is directed by Dr. Harold Dibble, Senor Fellow, Dr. Shannon P. McPherron, and Dr. Deborah I. Olszewski. She continues to work on the material collected during this study.  She also served as Assistant Director, Field Director and Surveyor on the Yale Monastic Archaeology Project, undertaken by Yale University, and the White Monastery Project, Consortium for Research and Conservation at the Monasteries of the Sohag Region of Egypt.

Dawn's publications reflect her work in the field and her research on the funerary practices of Egyptian royalty. She has several recent articles, including: "The 2011 Season of the South Abydos Mastabas Project," Bulletin of the American Research Center in Egypt 200 (2012), 31–33;  "Reconstructing Economic and Political Problems from the Remains of Royal Tombs: Dynasty XIII of Ancient Egypt," Archaeological Review from Cambridge 26.1 (2011), 37–52; "New Archaeology at Ancient Scetis: EDMAP surveys and Excavations at the Monastery of St. John the Little in the Wadi al-Natrun (2006–2007)," Dumbarton Oaks Papers 64 (2010), 217–28 (with Stephen J. Davis, Darlene Brooks Hedstrom, Tomasz Herbich, and Gillian Pyke); "The Significance of Royal Funerary Architecture in the Study of  13th Dynasty Kingship," in M. Marée, ed., The Second Intermediate Period (13th–17th Dynasties), Current Research, Future Prospects, Belgium: Peeters Leuven, 2010, 69–84, pl. 5; "Establishing the Legitimacy of Kings in Dynasty XIII," in Zahi Hawass and Jennifer Houser Wegner, eds., Millions of Jubilees: Studies in Honor of David P. Silverman, Vol. 1, Cairo: Conseil Suprême des Antiquités de l'Égyptie, 2010, 375–85.

Dawn has also given numerous presentations based on her research. Most recently she participated in the AIA Meetings in Seattle in January 2013, presenting "Excavations at South Abydos, Egypt: Unlocking the Secrets of 13th Dynasty Kingship." In September 2012, she gave a paper, "The View from Above: Using Satellite Imagery to Reconstruct the Monastery of St. John the Little," at the International Congress of Coptic Studies in Rome. In the spring of 2012 she presented two papers: "The Excavation of an Ancient Egyptian King's Tomb: The Key to Unlocking the Secrets of a Turbulent Era" at the College of Liberal Arts Scholars Day, Scholars Week at Middle Tennessee State University in March and "Report of the 2003 and 2011 Seasons of the South Abydos Mastabas Project" at the Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt in Providence, Rhode Island, in April.

Link:
http://www.mtsu.edu/history/history_faculty_directory/McCormack.php

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Sarah Laursen, Ph.D.
Visiting Research Scholar, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU
Elected: 2008 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations)

Sarah Laursen graduated from New York University in 2002 with a double major in Art History and East Asian Studies. Following undergraduate internships in the Asian departments of the Brooklyn Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she joined a two-year inventory project in the Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard University. Sarah began her doctoral studies at the University of Pennsylvania in 2004, in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. While in Philadelphia, she taught Asian art courses at Temple University, Moore College of Art & Design, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and participated in public outreach programming linked to the 2011 Secrets of the Silk Road exhibition. In spring 2011, Sarah defended her dissertation, "Leaves that Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments from Northeast China," and received her Ph.D. in Chinese art history. In fall 2011, she returned to her alma mater to join NYU's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World as a two-year postdoctoral fellow. She presented her dissertation research in October in a public lecture at ISAW. Her work at ISAW, "Unearthing the Ancient Craft: The Art of Goldsmithing in Early Medieval China," expands on her dissertation topic and involves an investigation into the gold objects excavated throughout China and their relationship to the metalworking traditions of Inner Asia, the Mediterranean, and Mesopotamia.

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Justin Leidwanger, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Stanford University
Elected: 2008 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Justin earned a B.A. in Classics (2001) from Loyola University in Chicago, and an M.A. in Anthropology and Nautical Archaeology (2005) from Texas A&M University. In 2011 he was granted a Ph.D. from the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World graduate group at Penn. Justin's dissertation, "Maritime Archaeology as Economic History: Long-term Trends of Roman Commerce in the Northeast Mediterranean," examines Roman and Late Roman (1st- to 7th-century A.D.) economic networks using shipwrecks off southwest Turkey and Cyprus. After graduating, Justin was Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU (2011-12) and Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Art and the Aegean Material Culture Lab at the University of Toronto (2012-13) before taking up an appointment as Assistant Professor in the Department of Classics at Stanford University.

Justin's research focuses primarily on the Roman maritime economy, especially shipwrecks, harbors, transport amphoras and other ceramics. As a Research Associate with the Institute of Nautical Archaeology since 2003, he directed surveys off Cyprus and served as INA's partner in several collaborative fieldwork and museum-based projects. In Turkey, he now co-directs the harbor explorations in conjunction with the Middle East Technical University project at Burgaz on the Datça peninsula. Most recently, he developed the Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project, a collaborative survey and excavation that incorporates maritime heritage outreach and museum and tourism development around the site of several wrecked merchant craft off the coast of Sicily, a project that was recently awarded an inaugural Cotsen Excavation Grant from the AIA.

As a Fellow of the Penn Cultural Heritage Center, Justin is also co-organizing (with Senior Fellow Richard Leventhal and two other colleagues) a three-part international workshop on underwater cultural heritage management titled "Who Owns Underwater Cultural Heritage? Perspectives on Archaeological Law and Ethics in the Mediterranean." Among his recent articles on this topic are two co-authored contributions to the American Journal of Archaeology and the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology focusing on ethical stewardship, responsible management, public involvement, and collaboration in maritime archaeological investigations.

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Matthew Liebmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Harvard University
Elected: 2002 (Department of Anthropology)

Matthew Liebmann is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. He has published research in American Anthropologist, the Journal of Field Archaeology, Kiva: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History, and Plains Anthropologist, and he is the author of Revolt: An Archaeological History of Pueblo Resistance and Revitalization in 17th Century New Mexico (University of Arizona Press, 2012) and co-editor of Archaeology and the Postcolonial Critique (Altamira Press, 2008) and Enduring Conquests: Rethinking the Archaeology of Resistance to Spanish Colonialism in the Americas (SAR Press, 2011).

Matt received his B.A. in English and Theology from Boston College in 1996. Following his graduation he taught at Red Cloud High School on the Pine Ridge (Oglala Lakota) Indian Reservation before entering graduate school at the University of Pennsylvania. At Penn he was a William Penn Fellow and a member of the Kolb Society of Fellows. From 2003 to 2005 he worked as tribal archaeologist and NAGPRA program director at the Pueblo of Jemez Department of Resource Protection. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology in 2006, and was named a University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences Dean's Scholar. He won the Society for American Archaeology's Dissertation Award in 2007, when he was an Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary. He began teaching at Harvard in 2009, and was a William and Rita Clements Fellow for the Study of Southwestern America at Southern Methodist University in 2010. Matt lives in Boston, Massachusetts, and continues to collaborate on archaeological research with the Pueblo of Jemez.

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James R. Mathieu, Ph.D.
Chief of Staff to the Williams Director, Penn Museum
Elected: 1993 (Department of Anthropology)

Jim received a B.A. and M.A. from Penn in Anthropology in 1992. He then went on to achieve an M.A. in Medieval Archaeology from the University of York in 1995. His Ph.D. came from the Department of Anthropology at Penn in 2001, where he wrote his dissertation under the supervision of Bernard Wailes, one of the first Kolb Senior Fellows. Jim's dissertation, entitled "Assessing Political Complexity in Medieval England: An Analysis of Royal Buildings and Strategies," sought to understand medieval England's political development through an analysis of material remains. He argued that medieval England's political organization was represented by the approximately 650 royal buildings that existed between AD 1066 and 1650, and he provided an analysis of the royal strategies that pertained to these structures.

Jim is an anthropological and medieval archaeologist who specializes in the study of social complexity, spatial analysis, fortifications, and experimental archaeology. His research interests, publications, and field experience include work in England, Wales, Ireland, France, Italy, Ukraine, Syria, Tunisia, Guatemala, Belize, and the United States. A former Editor of Penn Museum's Expedition magazine, he now oversees the Museum's collections staff (archivists, conservators, keepers, and registrars), publications program (monographs and Expedition), and digital media center (website and digital media content development, digitization lab, and photo studio) as the Chief of Staff to the Williams Director of the Penn Museum.

Jim has published in a wide variety of formats. He served as the editor of Penn Museum's magazine Expedition from 2004 to 2008, and has contributed articles, most recently the co-authored "From the Archives: Is Your Mind Ready for Adventure? Expedition Turns 50," Expedition 50(3): 6–16. He recently co-wrote "Defensibility and Settlement Patterns in the Guatemalan Maya Highlands" in Latin American Antiquity 18.2 (2007): 191–211. Jim has edited Penn Museum's annual report since 2007. He has edited two volumes: Experimental Archaeology: Replicating Past Objects, Behaviors, and Processes BAR International Series 1035 (Oxford) in 2002 and Exploring the Role of Analytical Scale in Archaeological Interpretation BAR International Series 1261 (Oxford) in 2004 with Fellow Rachel E. Scott. He has also published: "Medieval Royal Buildings" in Robin A. Butlin, ed., Historical Atlas of North Yorkshire, 2003: 82–5, and several co-authored articles on the field research of the Akkerman Fortress in Ukraine.

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Susanna McFadden, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Art History and Music, Fordham University
Elected: 2004 (Department of the History of Art)

Susanna earned her B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1998. She received her Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007. Her field of interest is the art, architecture, and archaeology of Late Antiquity, specializing in wall paintings of the Mediterranean region and early medieval Islamic art. Susanna's dissertation, "Courtly Places and Sacred Spaces: The Social and Political Significance of Monumental Wall Painting in Late Antiquity," examined three different architectural complexes with monumental painted figural programs as case studies: 1) a series of frescoes from the Tetrarchic period of Roman Egypt (late 3rd century CE) decorating an imperial cult chamber in the Pharaonic Temple of Luxor, 2) the so-called Domus Faustae, an early 4th century CE imperial domicile in Rome containing a painted procession depicting the family of Constantine the Great, and 3) Qusayr 'Amra, an Islamic monument of the Umayyad period (c. 724–743) in the Jordanian Desert, with paintings decorating the interior surface of a bath house/audience hall. These sites and their paintings were contextualized (historically, architecturally and topographically) in order to illuminate the powerful role visual communication played in the practice of late antique politics and culture. In 2008 Susanna joined the Department of Art History and Music at Fordham University, where she is also on the faculty of the Center for Medieval Studies. In 2009–2010 she won the Lily Auchincloss Post-Doctoral Rome Prize for her project "Articulating Power and Status in Late Antique Rome: A Study of Late Roman Pictorial Constellations" from the American Academy in Rome.

Since 2005 Susanna has also been a member of the team excavating the late Roman site of Amheida in Egypt's Dakhleh Oasis, a project sponsored by New York University (http://www.amheida.org.)

Forthcoming publications include, The Art of Maintaining an Empire: Roman Paintings in the Temple of Luxor (edited with Michael Jones), ARCE Conservation Series/Yale University Press; "Art on the Edge: The Late Roman Wall Paintings of Amheida, Egypt." In atti di XI Colloquio Internazionale dell'AIPMA (L'Associazione Internazionale per la Pittura Murale Antica), Efeso, dal 14 – 18 settembre, 2010; "When Image Divorces Text: The Late Antique Megalographia from the so-called Domus Faustae in Rome," in Memoires of the American Academy in Rome.

Links:
http://www.fordham.edu/academics/programs_at_fordham_/art_history_and_musi/faculty__staff/dr_susanna_mcfadden_69355.asp
http://www.amheida.org
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoFl6TiOMmI

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Leslee Michelsen, Ph.D.
Head of the Curatorial and Research Department at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar
Elected: 2007 (Department of the History of Art)

Leslee graduated from Hood College in 1997 with degrees in Art History and French. Her doctoral dissertation in the Art History Department at the University of Pennsylvania was entitled "'To Lift the Veil from the Face of Depiction': Figural Imagery and Visual Culture in Early Islamic Central Asia," and was successfully defended in June 2011. Leslee is currently the Head of the Curatorial and Research Department at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar.

She has excavated in Qatar, Israel, Turkey, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Afghanistan, where she conducted dissertation field research and consulted on a number of Islamic parchaeology and conservation projects as a volunteer with the Turquoise Mountain Foundation in Kabul. She is currently the Finds Supervisor and Co-Assistant Director for the Ancient Merv Project of UCL.

Leslee has lectured at Kabul University, Hood College, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the American University of Paris on her research. She has taught Islamic art history at Parsons Paris School of Art and Design as well as the Turquoise Mountain Foundation School in Kabul. Her published work includes articles on the history of Islamic calligraphy in Afghanistan, mina'i ware ceramics, and Saljuq stucco as well as the catalogue for an exhibition that she curated, entitled: Ferozkoh: Tradition and Continuity in Afghan Art, which premiered at MIA Doha in the spring of 2013, and opened in Leighton House Museum in London in the autumn of 2013. She is currently working on several projects including: narrative in Islamic art, jewellery from south-east Asia, and Bamiyan ceramics.

Links:
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/
http://http://www.mia.org.qa/
http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/subsites/nour/events/exhibitions/ferozkoh.aspx

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Bryan Miller, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Research Associate, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at Bonn University
Elected: 2006 (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations)

Bryan received his M.A. in archaeology from the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA in 2000 and his Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009. His dissertation, entitled "Power Politics in the Xiongnu Empire," collected evidence of elite strategies used to maintain authority through control of prestige goods networks and monumental constructions in the Xiongnu empire (3rd century BC–1st century AD) of Mongolia. Bryan received a Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS dissertation grant to conduct his research in Mongolian and North China. After graduating, he was an ACMS Research Fellow (funded by the Luce Foundation) and Consulting Scholar at the Penn Museum. He was also a Visiting Professor in the History Department at Rowan University. He is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and hosted at the University of Bonn in Germany. His research focuses on the emergence of empires in China and Mongolia and related social change. He examines the nature of hinterland communities and the relationships of individual locales with the development of imperial polities.

While a graduate student Bryan began research in Taiwan and Mongolia and managed the Xiongnu excavations portion of the Khanuy Valley Project. He is a co-director of the Mongol-American Khovd Archaeology Project, collaborating with the National Museum of Mongolia, which conducted excavations from 2006-2010. This project focuses on the peoples and cultures of the Mongolian Altai Mountains adjacent to present-day northwest China and Kazakhstan. Bryan's research investigates several burial grounds of the Xiongnu in the Altai Mountains, including excavations of full tomb complexes at a "royal" cemetery in the foothills of the Altai and a small hinterland burial ground up in the mountains.

In 2008 Bryan co-organized the International Conference on Xiongnu Archaeology in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He has also delivered several lectures including "Mobile Communities and Archaeological Analyses of Ancient Steppe Polities" in 2010 and "Reconstructing the Hunnu Empire through History, Archaeology, and Ethnography" in 2008 at the American Center for Mongolian Studies. Recently he presented "Negotiating the Frontier: Cultural Politics and the Southern Xiongnu" at the Political Strategies of Identity Building in Non-Han Empires in China Workshop at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. This fall he will participate in the Kolb Senior Scholars Colloquium.

Bryan's publications include Xiongnu Archaeology: Multidisciplinary Perspectives of the First Steppe Empire of Inner Asia, Bonn Contributions to Asian Archaeology 5, Bonn: Bonn University Press (2011), which he co-edited with U. Brosseder, and several articles such as "Permutations of Peripheries in the Xiongnu Empire," in the Xiongnu Archaeology volume; and co-authored articles "Xiongnu Constituents in the High Mountains – Results of the Mongol-American Khovd Archaeology Project, 2008," The Silk Road 7.1 (2009): 8–20; and "Elite Xiongnu Burials at the Periphery: Tomb Complexes at Tahiltin-hotgor, Mongolian Altai," in J. Bemmann, H. Parzinger, E. Pohl, and D. Tseveendorj, eds., Current Archaeological Research in Mongolia: Papers from the First International Conference on Archaeological Research in Mongolia, Bonn: Bonn University Press, 2009, 301–14. His present papers for publication include articles on globalized consumption and exotica in early East Asia and the political substrata of the Xiongnu empire.

Links:
http://www.silkroadfoundation.org/excavation/takhiltcemetary.html
http://silkroadfoundation.org/archaeology/khovd/

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Emily B Modrall, Ph.D.
Elected: 2007 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Emily received her B.A. from the University of Michigan in 2001 in Classical Archaeology, graduating magna cum laude with Highest Class Honors. She was also Phi Beta Kappa. She earned her M.Phil. in Classics in 2003 from the University of Cambridge–Trinity Hall. She has recently graduated from Penn, earning her Ph.D. in 2011 from the Graduate Group in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Her dissertation was entitled "Indigenous Identities in Punic Western Sicily," and her advisor was Jeremy McInerney. In addition to the Kolb Fellowship, during her graduate career Emily was awarded a Fulbright Grant for study in Italy in 2007–2008 and a Salvatori Research Award for the summers of 2005–2007 and the spring of 2011.

Emily's research interests encompass Phoenicio-Punic island settlement and regional economic networks in Sicily, Sardinia, and the western Mediterranean between the Iron Age and the Hellenistic period; Late Classical-Roman Republican rural settlement in the central/western Mediterranean; cultural contact and community identity in multi-ethnic contexts; and cultural heritage and the law. Her current fieldwork projects include the Colonial Landscape Project in Campobasso – Isernia, Italy (affiliated with the University of Leiden), the Terralba Rural Settlement Project in Terralba, Sardinia (associated with the universities of Valencia and Glasgow), and the Marsala Hinterland Survey in Marsala, Sicily (under the auspices of the University of Arizona). Emily has presented papers on her research in the United States, in Italy, and elsewhere in Europe, including "Defining 'Punicization' in Indigenous Western Sicily: Economy and Identity in the Material Record of the Fourth Century BCE," for the AAMW lecture series at Penn and "Cistern Complexes in Inland Western Sicily: New Water Supplies in the Fourth Century BCE," at the European Association of Archaeologists 16th Annual Meeting held in the Netherlands.

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Antonio J. Morales, Ph.D.
Lecturer and Research Associate, Ägyptologisches Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Elected: 2008 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Antonio received his B.A. in Archaeology from the University of Seville, Spain, in 1997. Later he studied Egyptology in England at the Universities of London (UCL) and Birmingham, as well as in Germany at the Freie Universität of Berlin. At Penn he studied Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, receiving his Ph.D. in 2013. His main areas of interest include Egyptian religion, ritual, particularly mortuary corpora, beliefs, and practices, magic, priesthood, literature, and kingship. Antonio's dissertation title is "The Transmission of the Pyramid Texts into the Middle Kingdom: Cultural and Philological Aspects of a Continuous Mortuary Tradition." He has been a postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Ägyptologisches Institut at the University of Heidelberg, where he has participated in the project SFB 933 "Materiale Textkulturen," conducting research on the composition and transmission of religious texts in the pyramids of Egyptian queens in the Old Kingdom. He is currently Lecturer and Research Associate at the Ägyptologisches Institut of the Freie Universität Berlin, where he teaches Egyptian language and conducts research on the transmission and reception of religious texts in first millennium B.C.E Egypt (research project SFB 980 "Episteme in Bewegung").

Antonio has participated in several excavations in Egypt at Abydos, El-Amra, Saqqara, and Thebes as archaeologist and epigrapher. In 1998, he volunteered as a research assistant at the Department of Egyptian Antiquities in the British Museum, London. In 2002, he received the Prize of the Spanish Association of Egyptology for his study "Doorways and Guardians of the Egyptian Netherworld," and later he received the William Penn Fellowship at Penn (2002–2007), the Kolb Fellowship (2007–2008), and the Freie Universität Berlin Stipendium for graduate studies in Germany (2008–2009). Furthermore, he has recently received The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship for conducting research at the University of Oxford (2009–2010), the J.R. Koury Endowment Fellowship (2010–2011), the Research Visiting Fellowship in Cultural and Intellectual History at the University of London, School of Advanced Studies–Warburg Institute (2011), and the DAAD fellowship for postdoctoral studies at Bonn Universität (2013). In addition, Antonio (along with Junior Fellow Melinda Nelson-Hurst) was awarded the Summer 2010 GAPSA-Provost Award for their research topic "On Kinship and Inheritance in Pharaonic Egypt."

Antonio has published several articles in peer-review journals and chapters to books. In 2001 he edited a book on the production and use of beer in ancient cultures, and has co-edited with Fellow Dr. Jane Hill and Dr. Philip Jones (Penn Museum, Babylonian Section) a multicultural and interdisciplinary conference volume Experiencing Power, Generating Authority: Cosmos, Politics, and the Ideology of Kingship in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, published by the University of Pennsylvania Museum Press in December 2013. In addition, he has taught in the Department of Ancient History at the University of Seville in 2011–2012 and is currently teaching at Freie Universität Berlin. He has given papers at international conferences and congresses in the United States, Germany, Netherlands, England, Czech Republic, Portugal, and Spain.

He is currently working on the publication of his study on the transmission of the Pyramid Texts into the Middle Kingdom (2014), the reception of religious texts in Heliopolitan and Theban tombs during the Late Period (2015), and the dissemination of a particular group of texts relating to the sky goddess Nut from the Old Kingdom to Greco-Roman times (2015).

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/
http://www.orinst.ox.ac.uk/
http://www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/e/aegyptologie/index.html
http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/
http://www.geschkult.fu-berlin.de/e/aegyptologie/mitarbeiter/wissenschaftliche_Mitarbeiter/Morales/index.html

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Ellen Morris, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Classics and Ancient Studies Department, Barnard College
Elected: 1995 (Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies)


Stephennie Mulder, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Art History, University of Texas, Austin
Elected: 2002 (Department of the History of Art)

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Melinda G. Nelson-Hurst, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Department of Anthropology; Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Studies, Tulane University
Elected: 2010 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Melinda completed a B.A. at Brandeis University in both History and Near Eastern and Judaic Studies, magna cum laude, in 2001, receiving the Chassler Prize and election into Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society upon graduation. She has recently completed her Ph.D. in Egyptology in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation is entitled "Ideology and Practicality in Transmission of Office during the Middle Kingdom of Ancient Egypt: An Examination of Families and the Concept of i3t" and was supervised by Kolb Senior Fellow David P. Silverman. Her dissertation examines the means through which officials transferred their positions to one another (i.e., whether through inheritance, family influence, legal transaction, one's merit, or a combination of methods) and how these methods may have changed over the span of the Middle Kingdom. The largest part of her study is prosopographical and includes a large number of family case studies. Through examining the positions held by family members, the prosopographical analysis exposes trends involving titles passed down through generations, family spheres of influence within particular sectors of the administration, and the various positions held among siblings. The dissertation also examines the Egyptian word for office (i3t) through a lexicographical study of the term's usage during the Middle Kingdom. Due to the predominantly literary/biographical nature of the texts in which the word i3t appears, the lexicographical study paints a picture of the ideology behind the concept of office, while the prosopographical study exposes the more practical realities of transferring positions.

Melinda was awarded a Samuel H. Kress, History of Art Institutional Fellowship through the American Research Center in Egypt for 2007–2008. Along with Junior Fellow Antonio Morales, she received the summer 2010 GAPSA-Provost Award for Interdisciplinary Innovation for their research topic "On Kinship and Inheritance in Pharaonic Egypt." They are currently preparing their study of the Egyptian words for "heir" and "inheritance" during the Old and Middle Kingdoms for presentation and publication. Melinda has also presented at international Egyptology conferences and published articles on the topic of family roles and their shift during the late Middle Kingdom and Second Intermediate Period, as well as contributed to the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Ancient History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). In addition, she has served as an excavator and surveyor at the sites of South Abydos and el-Amra in Egypt. Her research interests include social history, political history, administration, funerary practices, and family structures and genealogies.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/nelc/
http://upenn.academia.edu/MelindaNelsonHurst

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Lada Onyshkevych, Ph.D.
Elected: 1987 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

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Federico A. Paredes-Umana, Ph.D.
Elected: 2006 (Department of Anthropology)

Federico received his undergraduate degree from San Carlos University, Guatemala in 2005. He is a student in the Anthropology department and his concentration is on Mesoamerican Archaeology. Federico was elected a Kolb junior fellow in 2006 and works under the advise of Prof. Robert Sharer, who is an emeritus fellow.

Federico conducts fieldwork in the locality of Ataco, Ahuachapán, a little explored area of Western El Salvador. Federico's dissertation is based on his fieldwork at a late Preclassic site. He has also given several papers based on his research: a co-authored paper entitled "Portable-XRF Elemental Analysis of Archaeological Sediments: Some Examples from Mesoamerica," given at the Buffalo XRF meetings, in July 2010. In the spring of 2011 he delivered a paper entitled "A Public Funeral Covered With Ilopango (Tbj) Ash In Western El Salvador" at the SAA annual meeting in Sacramento, and he presented a talk at Penn Museum's Maya Weekend on the Jaguar Head Core Zone in western El Salvador.

Federico has also developed a website (www.atacoantiguo.com). The website is directed to the general public and highlights indigenous contributions to the cultural heritage of El Salvador. The site contains 3D animations of the Prehispanic cultural landscape in western El Salvador as well as academic papers and press articles discussing the two years of fieldwork undertaken by the Ataco Archaeological Project. The website is fueled by academic research conducted during 2006–2011 that focused on the complex societies of Mesoamerican tradition grouped in the "Jaguar Head Core Zone." The Jaguar Head Core Zone is an original contribution to Mesoamerican scholarship and can best be defined as a territory of over 3000sqkm in Western El Salvador where early Maya societies crafted a cultural landscape and synthesized several Mesoamerican traditions to a local symbolism expressed by the stone monuments known as Jaguar Heads. Scholars have recognized the Jaguar Head style since the beginning of the twentieth century, but only nine monuments had been adequately published as of 2006. Since then Federico has documented the provenience and locations of over 50 monuments, with photographs and the excellent drawings by Salvadoran artist Daniel Salazar. The Ataco Archaeological Project documented the long tradition of veneration and use of Jaguar Head monuments since the Preclassic Period (400–200 B.C.). Archaeological investigations also documented their re-use several centuries later (ca. 1000 A.D.) in a ritual of memory and pilgrimage in the Highland Sierra Apaneca-Ilamatepec.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/anthro/
http://www.atacoantiguo.com

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Bratislav Pantelic, Ph.D.
Faculty Member, History of Art Department, Sabanci University, Turkey
Elected: 1988 (Department of the History of Art)

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Wade Patterson, M.A.
Project Coordinator, Sawmill Community Land Trust
Elected: (Department of Anthropology, B.A.; Department of Folklore and Folklife, M.A.)

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Julia Perratore
Lecturer, Department of the History of Art, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2008 (
Department of the History of Art)

Julia is a graduate student in the History of Art at Penn. She received her B.A. in Art History from New York University. Her primary area of interest is twelfth-century sculpture in Northern Spain. Julia spent the 2008–2009 academic year in Spain with the assistance of a Travel Fellowship from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation. There she researched her dissertation on the Romanesque architectural sculpture of Santa María de Uncastillo, a twelfth-century church in Aragón with a rich cache of imagery that reflects the medieval experience of conquest and community building. Her dissertation is entitled "Romanesque on the Frontier: the Architectural Sculpture of Santa María de Uncastillo." She continued her archival research and on-site study during the fall of 2009 with a Research Grant from the Program for Cultural Cooperation between Spain's Ministry of Culture and United States Universities. In 2010 she received a Fulbright research grant for study in Spain, where she continued her fieldwork in Uncastillo. Julia's broader interest in the Mediterranean region has also led to research on the art and architecture of medieval Pisa, carried out in conjunction with the Kunsthistoriches Institut in Florenz – Max Planck Institut.

Julia has had a number of opportunities to deliver papers on her research. In April 2010, she presented part of her dissertation at the Penn History of Art colloquium. She has also discussed her work on Romanesque images of the Jewish community of Uncastillo at a conference held at the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Madrid, and presented a study of artistic exchange across the Pyrenees at the Université de Toulouse II - le Mirail. For the summer of 2012 Julia has a curatorial fellowship in medieval art at the Glencairn Museum.

Links:
http://www.arthistory.upenn.edu/

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Aubrey Baadsgaard Poffenberger, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 
Elected: 2006 (Department of Anthropology)

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Benjamin Porter, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Elected: 2001 (Department of Anthropology)

Benjamin is an Assistant Professor of Near Eastern archaeology in Berkeley's Near Eastern Studies Department and curator of Near Eastern archaeology at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum. Prior to his appointment at Berkeley, he taught at Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned his Ph.D. in Anthropology in 2007.  His dissertation, entitled "The Archaeology of Community in Iron I Central Jordan," investigated agro-pastoral settlements of the Iron I period (1200–1000 BCE) in the Southern Levant using a community framework. His current research interests include the archaeology of ancient Near Eastern social life, ancient materials and technologies, and Near Eastern archaeology's intellectual history.

He co-directs the Dhiban Excavation and Development Project (www.dhiban.org) in Jordan, which investigates how agro-pastoral communities, often living under empire, used technologies to organize agricultural and craft production in the region's semi-arid, resource-scarce environment. He also co-directs the Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project with Kolb Fellow Dr. Alexis Boutin of Sonoma State University. This project is researching and publishing the skeletal evidence and artifacts from Peter B. Cornwall's 1941 expedition to Bahrain and Eastern Saudi Arabia.

Benjamin's recent publications include: "The Dilmun Bioarchaeology Project: A First Look at the Peter B. Cornwall Collection at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology," Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy 23 (2012): 35–49 (co-authored with Fellow Alexis Boutin); "Face-to-face with the Past: Reconstructing a Teenage Boy from Early Dilmun," Near Eastern Archaeology 75/2 (2012): 68–79 (co-authored with Fellow Alexis Boutin, Sabrina Sholts, and Gloria Nusse); "Feeding the Community: Objects, Scarcity, and Commensality in the Early Iron Age Southern Levant," Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 24/1 (2011): 27–54; "Dry Dig: Ethics and Alcohol in Middle Eastern Archaeological Practice," Society for American Archaeology's Archaeological Record 10/5 (2010): 7–11; "Authority, Polity, and Tenuous Elites in Iron Age Edom (Jordan)," Oxford Journal of Archaeology 23/4(2004): 373–95.

He is also co-editing with Alexis Boutin Remembering and Commemorating the Dead: Recent Contributions in Bioarchaeology and Mortuary Archaeology from the Ancient Near East. This book, to be published by the University of Colorado Press, presents case studies exploring how ancient Near Eastern societies memorialized their dead. A book manuscript tentatively entitled Complex Communities: The Archaeology of Early Iron Age West-Central Jordan is in press with the University of Arizona Press and will be published next year. He recently started writing a new book exploring the role of Near Eastern archaeology in the contemporary Middle East.

Benjamin teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses at Berkeley. He mentors undergraduates through the Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program, providing opportunities for them to participate in field and laboratory research. In addition he directs an archaeological field school on his Dhiban Project in Jordan where students learn archaeological excavation and survey techniques. He has organized several conferences and workshops at Berkeley, including the 2011 annual meetings of the Theoretical Archaeology Group (TAG) USA (Theme: Archaeology of and in the Contemporary World) and The Berkeley Memory and Identity Working Group from 2009 to 2012. This fall he will be a speaker at the Kolb Senior Scholars Colloquium with Alexis Boutin.

Links:
http://nes.berkeley.edu/Web_Porter/Welcome.html
http://escholarship.org/uc/search?creator=Porter,%20Benjamin%20W
http://berkeley.academia.edu/BenjaminPorter
http://dhiban.org

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Jon Pressman, Ph.D.
Product Director, Viibryd at Forest Laboratories, New York
Elected: 1991 (Department of Anthropology)

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Teresa P. Raczek, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Geography and Anthropology, Kennesaw State University, Georgia 
Elected: 2001 (Department of Anthropology)

 

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John Henry Rice, Ph.D.
Associate Curator of South Asian and Islamic Art, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, Virginia 
Elected: 2005 (Department of the History of Art)

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Joshua Roberson, Ph.D.
Faculty Member, Department of History, Philosophy and Political Science, Camden County College, New Jersey 
Elected: 2001 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

Josh received his Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Pennsylvania in Egyptology, with a minor in Cuneiform Studies. His dissertation, "The Book of the Earth: A Study of Ancient Egyptian Symbol-Systems and the Evolution of New Kingdom Cosmographic Models," was supervised by Senior Fellow David P. Silverman. Josh's B.A. (1997) is from the University of North Texas, where he majored in Anthropology with a minor program in Philosophy. Currently Josh is an Assistant Professor of History at Camden County College in Blackwood, New Jersey, a position he has held since 2011. He serves as the Projects Coordinator and Grant Writer for the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility in Blackwood. He is also a Consulting Scholar in the Egyptian Section at the Penn Museum. Previously, he was a Lecturer in Egyptology at Penn and a Lecturer in History and Anthropology at the University of North Texas in Denton. In 2008 he received the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) fellowship. While a graduate student at Penn he was awarded, in addition to the Kolb, the Arts and Sciences Dissertation Fellowship (2006–2007) and the Felix J. Korsyn Prize in Egyptology (2006).

Josh's research centers on the art and literature of ancient Egypt. He has worked as an epigrapher for the Penn Expedition to Saqqâra, Egypt, led by Senior Fellow David Silverman; a sigillographer and epigrapher for the Penn Expedition to Abydos, Egypt, led by Dr. Josef Wegner; and the chief sigillographer for the French-Egyptian expedition (CNRS/CFEETK) to the Opet precinct of Karnak temple in Luxor, Egypt. His conference contributions and invited lectures indicate his fieldwork and research interests. In 2010 he presented "The Secret History of Karnak Temple: Civil Administration and Sigillography in Middle Kingdom Thebes" and "(Re)-imagining the Underworld: Textual Transmission, Art, and Architecture at el-Asasif Necropolis" at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He has consistently presented papers at the Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, including most recently, "The Awakening of Osiris: Interpretations and Observations on a Recalcitrant Sequence of Cryptographic Texts" in 2012. Josh also works to further public interest in Egyptology. He served as a commentator and co-host for the television documentary "Under the Pyramids," produced by Discovery and the BBC. In 2012, he spearheaded the lecture series "Beyond the Pyramids: An Introduction to the Religion and Culture of Ancient Egypt," and is currently the organizer of "Hidden Histories of Ancient Egypt" on behalf of the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility in Blackwood, New Jersey.

Josh's many publications reflect the breadth of his research. He has recently published The Ancient Egyptian Books of the Earth, Wilbour Studies in Egypt and Ancient Western Asia, Vol. 1, Atlanta: Lockwood Press & Brown University, 2012. In addition, he is a contributing author to Le parvis du temple d'Opet à Karnak. Exploration archéologique (2006–2007), Cairo: IFAO, also published in 2012. He authored the chapter "A Good Burial" for C. Routledge, ed., Quest for Immortality, The Bolton Collection, Taipei, China: Media Sphere and United Exhibits Group, 2011, 244–253. His numerous articles include "A New Nautical Idiom for Hoisting Sails (in the Underworld)?" Göttinger Miszellen 233 (2012), 43–50; in 2011, "The Trampled Foe: Two New Examples of a Rare Amuletic Form," Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 96 (2010), 219–222; in 2010, "A Solar Litany from the Tomb of Ramesses IX," Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 45 (2009), 227–232; "Observations on the So-called 'sw sm=f,' or Middle Egyptian Proclitic Pronoun Construction," in Z. Hawass and Jennifer Wegner, eds., Millions of Jubilees: Studies in Honor of David P. Silverman, SASAE 39 (2009), Cairo: SCA, Vol. 2, 185–205; and  "The Early History of 'New Kingdom' Netherworld Iconography: A Late Middle Kingdom Apotropaic Wand Reconsidered," in D.P. Silverman, W.K. Simpson, and Josef Wegner, eds., Archaism and Innovation: Studies in the Culture of Middle Kingdom Egypt, New Haven and Philadelphia: Yale and University of Pennsylvania, 2009, 427–445.

Link:
http://camdencc.academia.edu/JoshuaRoberson

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Cynthia Robinson, Ph.D.
Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of History of Art, Cornell University
Elected: 1987 (Department of the History of Art)

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Matthew Rutz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies, Brown University
Elected: 2004 (Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations)

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Kelcy Sagstetter, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, Oberlin College
Elected: 2011 (Ancient History Graduate Group)

Kelcy earned her B.A. in Classics and Ancient History from the University of Texas at Austin, followed by an M.A. in Latin Literature at Boston University. She received her Ph.D. from the Ancient History graduate group at Penn, with her dissertation entitled "Solon of Athens: The Man, the Myth, the Tyrant?" She has conducted fieldwork all over the world, including underwater survey at Episkopi Bay and Cape Greco on Cyprus, and has excavated at Villa Magna in Italy, Olbia in Ukraine, and worked as a trench supervisor at Corinth. She has participated in field survey in central Lydia, and worked at Eleusis on the Eleusis 3D Archaeological Imaging Project.

Kelcy spent two years at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. In 2009–2010, she was a Regular Member thanks to generous funding from the John Williams White Fellowship. She spent the 2010–2011 academic year as the Edward Capps Student Associate Fellow. While in Athens, she examined the stone containing the inscription of Drakon's Law on Homicide in the Epigraphic Museum, using a Breuckmann SmartSCAN HE 3D scanner to create a submillimeter resolution data set in order to produce more detailed images of the stone's exterior. She is currently engaged in processing the data using a range of software tools including OptoCat, RapidForm and GIS to develop new, precise, and varied methods for analysis of the stele's surface and to determine whether additional text can be deciphered. Kelcy has undertaken this project in conjunction with the Center for Advanced Spatial Technology at the University of Arkansas, where she is currently a CAST fellow, and is in the process of preparing a joint publication on the results.

Links
http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/anch/
http://cast.uark.edu/home.html
http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/Spiffs/excavations-in-the-nezi-field-in-ancient-corinth-2010/

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Teagan Schweitzer, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2008 (Department of Anthropology)

Teagan earned her B.A. in Anthropology with honors from Michigan University in 2002, after spending her junior year studying at Cambridge University. She received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Penn in 2010. While at Penn she was awarded several research fellowships including a Winterthur Research Fellowship and a fellowship from the Program in Early American Economy and Society (PEAES), as well as a William Penn Fellowship, in addition to being named a Kolb junior fellow. Teagan now teaches the Introduction to Archaeology course at Penn. She also is a consulting zooarchaeologist for URS Corporation, an engineering company based in Burlington, NJ.

Teagan's research interests include food and foodways, the anthropology of food, zooarchaeology, and historical archaeology. Her dissertation was entitled "Philadelphia Foodways ca. 1750–1850: An Historical Archaeology of Cuisine." She has published "Thoughts on Ethnic Foodways and Identity," Repast 21/2 (2005): 3; "The Turtles of Philadelphia's Culinary Past," Expedition 51 (2009): 3; and "Catfish, Waffles, and Coffee: A Historical Philadelphia Icon," Penn Appetit 6 (2010): 14–15. She has participated in fieldwork in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Hawaii, Kenya, and Bolivia. In 2012, Teagan received an Upton Foundation Fellowship from the William L. Clements Library in Ann Arbor, Michigan, to conduct research on "Defining American Cuisine: An Exploration of American Identity Through Examination of Early American Foodways."

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Rachel E. Scott, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Anthropology Department, DePaul University
Elected: 1998 (Department of Anthropology)

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Page Selinsky, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
Elected: 2000 (Department of Anthropology)

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Julia L. Shear, Ph.D.
Onassis Visiting Instructor, Department of History at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul
Elected: 1998 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Julia is an historian of ancient Greece and an archaeologist with a particular interest in the ancient city of Athens. She is currently an Onassis Visiting Instructor in the Department of History at Boğaziçi University in Istanbul where she teaches ancient Greek history and classical archaeology. As an undergraduate, Julia studied Classics at Harvard University and spent a semester in Rome at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies. After she graduated, she spent a year in Athens where, as the John Williams White Fellow, she did the regular program of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Julia then came to the University of Pennsylvania in the first class of students in the Graduate Group of Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World. Interested already both in history and in archaeology, she wrote her doctoral dissertation on the history and development of the Panathenaia, the most important religious festival in ancient Athens. Part of this project was supported by the Kolb Foundation, after Julia was elected a Junior Fellow in 1998. Having completed her doctoral degree, she spent four years in Cambridge as a postdoctoral researcher on the AHRB Anatomy of Cultural Revolution Project, which was jointly located in the Faculty of Classics at the University of Cambridge and King's College. Subsequently, she taught at the University of Glasgow for four years and then was in Athens for four years as a Senior Associate Member of the American School of Classical Studies. Julia has excavated extensively in Greece, Cyprus, and Italy.

In her research, Julia uses both written evidence and material culture to provide a holistic picture of Athenian society and culture. She is particularly interested in how the Athenians remembered and responded to the city's past(s). These issues played an important part in how the Athenians responded publicly to the oligarchic revolutions at the end of the fifth century B.C. when oligarchs twice overthrew the democracy, as she has discussed in her book Polis and Revolution: Responding to Oligarchy in Classical Athens (Cambridge, 2011). It focuses particularly on the recreation of democracy and the city, both ritually and physically, in the aftermath of these coups and on how these revolutions were remembered and forgotten. Julia's book was shortlisted for the Runciman Award 2012. The politics of Athenian collective or social memory is a related area of interest for Julia and she has plans in the future to write a book about these processes. Her main current research focuses on Athenian religion, especially the Panathenaia, and she is writing a book about how the festival was a place for constructing Athenian identities and how it affected those identities. This work develops directly out of her doctoral dissertation. She also works extensively on Athenian inscriptions, documents carved on stone and so made public, and they appear in many of her articles and in her book. She focuses on them not only as texts of documents, but also as monuments in their own right that belong in a particular spatial setting and context.

Links:
http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/
http://www.classics.cam.ac.uk/
http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item1173609/?site_locale=en_GB
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item1174671/?site_locale=en_GB
http://www.cambridge.org/gb/knowledge/isbn/item5744227/?site_locale=en_GB
http://ascsa.academia.edu/JuliaLShear

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Karen Sonik, Ph.D
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, UCLA
Elected: 2006 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

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Miranda Suri, Ph.D.
Adjunct Faculty, Department of Anthropology, Queens College 
Elected: 2004 (Department of Anthropology)

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Christopher P. Thornton, Ph.D.
Program Officer, Committee for Research and Exploration, National Geographic Society
Elected: 2002 (Department of Anthropology)

Chris earned his A.B. from Harvard University in Archaeometry and Archaeology, graduating in 2001. He received an M.Phil. in World Prehistory: Southern and Eastern Europe from the University of Cambridge in 2002 before entering the Anthropology department at Penn. He graduated from Penn in 2009 with a Ph.D. in Anthropology; his dissertation was entitled, "The Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age Metallurgy of Tepe Hissar, Northeastern Iran: A Challenge to the 'Levantine Paradigm'." For this work, Chris analyzed different forms of metallurgical craft production in domestic and workshop contexts at the Chalcolithic site of Tepe Hissar in Northeastern Iran. While at Penn he received several awards including an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (2002–2005), a White-Levy Grant for Archaeological Publications, Co-P.I. (2006–2008), and was elected to the Kolb Fellowship in 2002. Following graduation, Chris taught for a year at George Mason University in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology, but since 2010 has been the Program Officer for the Committee for Research and Exploration at the National Geographic Society.

Chris's research interests include craft production (especially metallurgy and ceramics), social complexity, monumentality, non-traditional forms of urbanism, and the application of archaeological science. He has excavated at Mapungubwe in South Africa, Sotira Kaminoudhia in Cyprus, Szazhalombatta in Hungary, Konar Sandal in Iran, and is currently Director of the Penn Museum excavations at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. He has written a number of articles including "Genes, Language, and Culture: An Example from the Tarim Basin," Oxford Journal of Archaeology 23.1 (2004): 83–106 (with T.G. Schurr); "A New Look at the Prehistoric Metallurgy of Southeastern Iran," Iran XLII (2004): 47–59 (with C.C. Lamberg-Karlovsky); "The Emergence of Complex Metallurgy on the Iranian Plateau: Escaping the Levantine Paradigm," Journal of World Prehistory 22(3), 2009: 301–27; and "The Development of Metallurgy in Eurasia," Antiquity 83(322), 2009: 1012–22 (with B.W. Roberts and V.C. Pigott).

Links:
www.cpthornton.info

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Elif Ünlü, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Boğaziçi Universitesi
Elected: 2008 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Elif has a B.A. in Economics and German from Agnes Scott College and a M.A. in Economics from the University of Pittsburgh. She received her M.A. in Archaeology from the Department of History in 2003 from Boğaziçi University. In 2009 she earned her Ph.D. in Archaeology from the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Program at the University of Pennsylvania. Her dissertation was entitled "Technological and Stylistic Evaluation of the Early Bronze Age Pottery at Tarsus-Gözlükule: Pottery Production and Its Interaction with Economic, Social, and Cultural Spheres." Elif's research interests include the archaeology of Anatolian, Aegean, Iranian, and Mesopotamian prehistory, with theoretical studies in technology and society, trade in ancient economies, and landscape archaeology. At present, Elif is an Assistant Professor at Boğaziçi University in the Department of History. She has been teaching there since her graduation from Penn in 2009.

Elif has experience excavating at sites in Germany, Iran, and Turkey. Since 2001 she has been the Project Assistant for the Tarsus-Gözlükule Archaeological Project in Mersin, Turkey. Also, beginning in 2010 she has been the pottery specialist at the Tell Ta'yinat Archaeological Project in Antioch, Turkey.

Elif has published articles on her excavations and research into pottery production, technology, and style. Most recently she published "A Tale of Two Potting Traditions: Technological Assessment of the Light Clay and the Red Gritty Ware Types at Tarsus-Gözlükule (Cilicia-Turkey) at the Beginning of the Third Millennium B.C." in the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 362. She is a contributing scholar to the Digital Gordion website at http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/history/bronzeage. She has presented papers on her research at conferences in the United States and Turkey. Most recently she delivered the paper "Late Bronze-Early Iron Age Transitional Pottery from the Northeast Mediterranean Settlements" at NOSTOI: Indigenous Culture, Migration, and Integration in the Aegean Islands and Western Anatolia during the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age, held in Istanbul in the spring of 2011. Her paper is forthcoming in the conference publication. Also, in the fall of 2013, Elif delivered the lecture "Recent Excavations at Tarsus-Gozlüküle in Turkey: Bronze Age through Abbasid" at the Penn museum.

Links:
http://hist.boun.edu.tr/elif.unlu.php
http://sites.museum.upenn.edu/gordion/history/bronzeage

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Günder Varinlioglu, Ph.D.
Elected: 2004 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

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Matthew W. Waters, Ph.D.
Professor of Classics and Ancient History, Department of Foreign Languages, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire
Elected: 1991 (Ancient History Graduate Group)

Matt received his B.A. from the University of Notre Dame, and both his M.A. and Ph.D. (1997) from the University of Pennsylvania in Ancient History. He has taught at Penn and the University of Delaware, and he joined the University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire faculty as Assistant Professor of Classics and Ancient History in 2001. He is currently Professor of Classics and Ancient History and teaches a variety of ancient history, language, and literature courses. Matt was the winner of the Greenfield Prize from the American Oriental Society in 2006 and has been awarded fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies as well as Harvard University's Loeb Classical Library Foundation. He is currently a fellow at the Center for Hellenic Studies and the Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Matt's research interests include Assyrian-Elamite relations and the Achaemenid Persian Empire in the mid-first millennium BCE. He also examines cross-cultural connections between the ancient Near East and the Classical Greek world. He has published a book based on his dissertation entitled A Survey of Neo-Elamite History (2000). He has co-edited If a Man Built a Joyful House: Assyriological Studies in Honor of Erle Verdun Leichty (2006). He has published numerous articles and book reviews on ancient Near Eastern and Greek history, among them "Parsumash, Anshan, and Cyrus," in J. Alvarez-Mon and M. Garrison, eds., Elam and Persia (2011), 'Cyrus and the Achaemenids' in Iran (2004) and 'A Letter from Ashurbanipal to the Elders of Elam' in Journal of Cuneiform Studies (2002).

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Wu Xin, Ph.D.
Noble Group Fellow, W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research
Elected: 2001 (Department of the History of Art)

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Stephan Zink, Ph.D.
Research Fellow, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
Elected: 2007 (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Graduate Group)

Stephan received his M.A. in Classical Archaeology, History and Political Philosophy at the University of Vienna, Austria in 2003. His M.A. thesis was entitled "Hellenistic Archives: Architecture and Function." He spent two years as an exchange student at the Free University in Berlin and the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. After joining AAMW as a Fulbright-fellow, he continued his studies in Hellenistic and Roman urbanism and architecture, as well as social and economic history. His advisor is Prof. Lothar Haselberger. Stephan's fieldwork experience includes several excavations in Austria and southern Italy. He also worked for several seasons in Syria with international crews at Dura Europos and in Palmyra.

Stephan's dissertation research involves an architectural study of the sanctuary of Apollo on the Palatine hill in Rome. It includes an on-site documentation of all archaeological remains preserved on the site, from the earliest structures that precede the sanctuary to its Imperial and Late Antique phases. The applied method of documentation entails traditional hand drawings, but also the latest techniques of digital surveying and 3D modeling. The sanctuary of Apollo was built by Octavian and dedicated in 28 B.C., just a year before he became Emperor Augustus. This monument was dedicated at a key moment in Roman history, and it embodies the transition from Roman Republic to Roman Empire. Stephan has conducted fieldwork campaigns at the sanctuary of Apollo over several years, and he is the first to systematically examine and document all construction phases of the site.

Links:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/aamw/
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/home/SASFrontiers/zink.html
http://www.ostina.org/content/view/5322/1448/
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/03/080314-rome-temple.html
http://www.idb.arch.ethz.ch/1-1-home.html

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